Russian foreign minister says there are 'so many p******' in the US presidential race when asked about Donald Trump

'There are so many p****** around your presidential campaign on both sides, that I prefer not to comment about this', Sergey Lavrov says

Caroline Mortimer
Wednesday 12 October 2016 23:40
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Russia's Foreign Minister says 'there are so many pussies around both presidential campaigns'

The Russian foreign minister has claimed there are “so many p******” on both sides of the US presidential election.

During an interview with CNN, Sergey Lavrov was asked about comments Republican nominee Donald Trump was heard saying in a 2005 interview unearthed by the Washington Post where he claimed he could “grab women by the p****” without consequences because he was a “star”.

In response Mr Lavrov said: "English is not my mother tongue, I don't know that I would sound decent.

“There are so many p****** around your presidential campaign on both sides, that I prefer not to comment about this”.

Following the release of the footage on Friday evening, Mr Trump’s fortunes have gone into steep decline with many Republican leaders, such as House Speaker Paul Ryan, saying they can no longer endorse him.

Pollster Nate Silver, who successfully predicted the result of all 50 states during the 2012 election, now says Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has an 86 per cent chance of winning the election on 8 November.

The comments come at a time of heightened tensions between the US and Russia.

Mr Lavrov denied that Russia had interfered with the US presidential election after they were accused of hacking in the Democratic Executive Committee’s (DEC) email server and leaking over 20,000 emails where top party bosses discuss how to push Bernie Sanders out of the race.

The revelations led to the resignation of the DEC chair, Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

Mr Trump is believed to be the Kremlin’s preferred choice for the presidency and Ms Clinton said she wanted to “rein Russia in”.

During a debate with Ms Clinton on Sunday evening, Mr Trump said Putin and Syrian President Bashar al-Assad were “helping to fight Isis”.

Russian air strikes on rebel-controlled eastern Aleppo have killed at least 350 people in the past month and many more are in critical danger as aid cannot get through and there are only 30 doctors left to tend to the wounded.

The area under attack is controlled by a coalition of secular rebels and Jabhat Fateh al-Sham (previously known as Jabhat al Nusra), not Isis.

Last month during an emergency session of the UN Security Council, the US, British and French ambassadors walked out when the Syrian ambassador attempted to defend the bombing they have described as a “war crime”.

Last week, the Republican Vice-presidential nominee Governor Mike Pence suggested the US should intervene militarily in Syria if Russia continues to target civilians but Mr Trump said he disagreed.

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