Rudy Giuliani reportedly in talks to testify before Jan 6 committee

Sources said Mr Giuliani would be reluctant to share any of his direct communications with Donald Trump

Rudy Giuliani says his mission is to 'disrupt the world'

Donald Trump's former lawyer Rudy Giuliani is in talks with the US Congress to testify about his role in last year's attack on the Capitol, according to reports.

Sources told The New York Times that Mr Giuliani is negotiating with the House of Representatives committee investigating the 6 January riot and may answer some of its questions.

The committee, which comprises seven Democrats and two Republicans, has issued a subpoena seeking to legally compel Mr Giuliani to testify about his wide-ranging campaign to overturn the result of the 2020 election.

Mr Giuliani, a former mayor of New York City and Republican presidential candidate, played a leading role in Mr Trump's attempt to negate his defeat with dubious claims of widespread voting fraud.

His efforts led the state of New York and the city of Washington, DC to ban him from practising law, with a New York court accusing him of making “demonstrably false and misleading statements”.

According to the New York Times, the committee's subpoena orders Mr Giuliani to hand over all documents relating to the Trump team's pressuring of state election officials, its contacts with congressfolk, its plans to potentially seizing voting machines, and Mr Giuliani's fees as a lawyer.

Sources told ABC News that the negotiations were nowhere near final and could yet collapse, with Mr Guiliani reluctant to share any of his communications with Mr Trump.

A spokesperson for the committee said: "Mr Giuliani's appearance was rescheduled at his request. He remains under subpoena and the select committee expects him to cooperate fully."

Most of Mr Trump's closest allies have refused to testify before the committee, which is has interviewed more than 500 people as it probes Mr Trump and his aides' role in the violence at the Capitol.

Last year the committee charged Mr Trump's former chief of staff Mark Meadows and onetime adviser Steve Bannon with criminal contempt, although Mr Meadows did hand over some documents.

Sources told the Times that Mr Giuiliani's lawyer has signalled to the committee that he will be less rigid, but was still negotiating over whether to give a formal deposition or an informal interview.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in