Majority of US voters say Donald Trump is not fit to be President, finds poll

'There is no upside,' says survey's director

Jon Sharman
Thursday 28 September 2017 11:58
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President Donald Trump's approval rating is languishing in the mid-30s
President Donald Trump's approval rating is languishing in the mid-30s

More than half of Americans believe Donald Trump is unfit to be President, according to a new poll.

Men are evenly split on the question but nearly two-thirds of women, or 63 per cent, said Mr Trump was not qualified to hold the top office.

The poll, by Quinnipiac University, also found that 94 per cent of black voters thought the billionaire unfit to serve as commander in chief. Even 14 per cent of Republicans shared that view.

Overall the survey of 1,412 registered voters found that 56 per cent were unconvinced of Mr Trump's suitability to occupy the Oval Office, with a 3.1-percentage point margin of error.

Americans also disapprove of the performance of Republicans in Congress by a margin of 78 per cent to 15, making dismal reading for the ruling party.

Mr Trump has struggled to work with politicians in his own party, tasting failure in successive bids to rally support for the repeal of Obamacare.

Sixty-nine per cent of voters believe the President should stop using Twitter, Quinnipiac found.

Tim Malloy, assistant poll director, said: "There is no upside. With an approval rating rating frozen in the mid-30s, his character and judgement questioned, President Donald Trump must confront the harsh fact that the majority of American voters feel he is simply unfit to serve in the highest office in the land.

"A divider, responsible for the deepening chasm of racial discord. That is the inescapable characterisation of President Trump from voters who see race relations deteriorating on his watch."

Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed disapproved of Mr Trump's performance on race relations, ranging from 55 per cent of whites to 95 per cent of blacks.

The poll was taken after Mr Trump sparked controversy with his equivocal response to the far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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