Rohingya Muslim woman has leg blown off by landmine as she flees Burma for Bangladesh

Other reports say a boy had his leg blown off near a border crossing

Samuel Osborne
Thursday 07 September 2017 12:17
Comments
Rohingya refugees are seen waiting for a boat to cross the border through the Naf river in Maungdaw, Burma
Rohingya refugees are seen waiting for a boat to cross the border through the Naf river in Maungdaw, Burma

A Rohingya Muslim woman reportedly had her leg blown off by a landmine as she fled Burma for Bangladesh.

A government source in Dhaka told the Mail Online Burma was placing landmines at its border, following reports their purpose may be to prevent the return of Rohingya Muslims fleeing violence.

"They are putting the landmines in their territory along the barbed-wire fence," the source said.

They added: "Our forces have also seen three to four groups working near the barbed wire fence, putting something into the ground.

"We then confirmed with our informers that they were laying land mines."

One of the reported victims was a woman whose leg was mutilated as she tried to cross the border.

Earlier this week, a Bangladesh border guard told Reuters one boy had his leg blown off near a border crossing before being brought to Bangladesh for treatment, while another boy suffered minor injuries.

Video shows Rohingya flee burning villages in Myanmar

About 164,000 Rohingya from the area have fled across the border into Bangladesh in less than two weeks since Rohingya insurgents attacked police outposts in Gawdu Zara and several other villages, the UN refugee agency said.

The military has said nearly 400 people, most they described as insurgents, had died in clashes and that troops were conducting "clearance operations." It blames insurgents for setting the villages on fire, without offering proof.

The Rohingya who have fled Burma, however, all described large-scale violence perpetrated by Burmese troops and Buddhist mobs — setting fire to their homes, spraying bullets indiscriminately, stabbing civilians and ordering them to abandon their homes or be killed.

Burning Rohingya homes can make it less likely that they return.

Tens of thousands of Rohingya were driven from their homes in another wave of violence in 2012. Many of them are now confined to camps, while the land they once held is either vacant or occupied by Buddhist squatters.

Burma refers to Rohingya as Bengalis, contending they migrated illegally from Bangladesh, although many Rohingya families have lived in Burma for generations.

With so many Rohingya fleeing Burma, it's unclear how many remain.

Before the recent violence, aid experts had estimated about one million Rohingya were living in northern Rakhine state, but aid agencies have been unable to access the area since.

Additional reporting by agencies

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in