As cases spike, Denmark lifts all Covid restrictions

The Danish PM said the country was returning to ‘life as we knew it before corona’

<p>Customers at the fishmarket in Torvehallerne in Copenhagen. As of today it is no longer mandatory to wear protection mask anywhere in public in Denmark</p>

Customers at the fishmarket in Torvehallerne in Copenhagen. As of today it is no longer mandatory to wear protection mask anywhere in public in Denmark

Life in Denmark returned to normal from Tuesday following the decision to lift all Covid restrictions.

The Scandinavian country is now expected to reopen nightclubs, museums and theatres and scrap limited opening hours for bars and restaurants. Facemasks and Covid passes will only be recommended for hospital visits.

The easing coincides with a considerable spike in cases over the past 14 days, with around 40,000-50,000 daily cases of the virus.

But in a country where more than 60 per cent of the population has received a third dose, studies show that the feeling of societal threat has dropped sharply.

“Virtually all infections in Denmark are now omicron. The combination of omicron and high booster coverage decouples infection and severity. While there are high case counts, the pressure on the hospitals is lower than in previous waves,” tweeted Michael Bang Petersen, an advisor to the Danish government.

Despite a failed attempt at lifting all its restrictions between September and November the government strategy continues to enjoy broad support, with 64 per cent of Danes saying they have faith in the government Covid policy, according to a poll published on Monday by Danish newspaper Politiken.

"We can’t provide any guarantees when it comes to biology", Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said last week when announcing the country’s return "to life as we knew it before corona".

Only a few restrictions remain in place at the country’s borders, for unvaccinated travellers arriving from non-Schengen countries, while Schengen travellers will no longer be asked for pre-entry testing requirements, the Ministry of Health said last week.

“Should Denmark wait until all concerns have been settled? Maybe,” government advisor Michael Bang Petersen wrote on Twitter. “But waiting is not free. It has costs in terms of the economy, well-being and democratic rights. Balancing these is an explicit part of the Danish strategy.”

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