Italian court orders 'provocatively effeminate' teenage boy to spend 12 hours each day away from mother

Court rules 13-year-old has a 'personality disorder' from spending too much time with exclusively female role models

Caroline Mortimer
Wednesday 11 January 2017 14:14
Comments
The boy was referred to the Court of Minors after social services in Padua reportedly that he was too effeminate
The boy was referred to the Court of Minors after social services in Padua reportedly that he was too effeminate

An Italian court has ruled that a teenage boy be partially removed from his mother’s custody after lawyers claimed he was “effeminate in a provocative way”.

The court in Venice heard the 13-year-old must be suffering from a “personality disorder” due to having “almost exclusively female role models”.

State lawyers say the boy “tries in every way to show that he is different” and highlighted an incident when he went to school wearing eyeshadow and nail varnish, which his mother said was for a Halloween party.

A social services report on the boy, from nearby Padua, said he was suffering from a “personality disorder” and argued that he had difficulty forming relationships with other people due to his dependence on his mother, local newspaper Mattino Padova reported.

The court heard how the mother of the boy, identified only as “Marco”, had been reported by social services after she refused to allow his father to see him – accusing him of sexual abuse.

Social services reported Marco’s “emotional world appeared tied almost exclusively to female figures and the relationship with the mother appeared characterised by aspects of addiction”.

The President of the Court of Minors, Maria Teresa Rossi, ruled that both parents had failed in their parental responsibility towards the child and ordered that the boy spend 12 hours a day, between 7am and 7pm, in a “youth community” to gain some independence from his mother.

But she denied she had made the decision to impose the partial removal order because the boy was “camp”.

She said: “The court does not impose the distance due to an alleged effeminate attitude. We have no preconceptions [about the boy’s sexual orientation].

“Any measure that restricts parental responsibility is linked to a comprehensive review of their adequacy to full their role and the protection of the child is our primary interest”.

The lawyer for the boy’s mother, Francesco Miraglia, said the decision was “outrageous” and said he would appeal the verdict in a secondary hearing which is due to take place next week.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in