Seized Isis documents outline rules for enslaving and raping captured women

The documents were obtained in a Syria raid in which Isis’ top financial official Abu Sayyaf was killed

Loulla-Mae Eleftheriou-Smith
Monday 28 December 2015 17:53
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Kashmiri demonstrators hold up a flag of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) during a demonstration against Israeli military operations in Gaza
Kashmiri demonstrators hold up a flag of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) during a demonstration against Israeli military operations in Gaza

Isis documents seized by US Special Operations Forces have laid bare the brutal reality of the militant organisation’s treatment of its female prisoners, outlining its rules on rape and enslavement.

The documents, seen by Reuters, were obtained in a Syria raid in May, during which time Isis’ top financial official Abu Sayyaf was killed.

A huge range of data sources were seized which have helped US authorities to illustrate how Isis organises itself, from the management of the terrorists’ revenue streams to its handling of stolen oil, antiquities, subjugated people and rules on raping female prisoners.

One booklet seen by Reuters is entitled ‘From our creator’s rulings on capturing prisoners and enslavement,’ and sets clear rules for how to enslave women who have been imprisoned after their “infidels” have been defeated.

The booklet attempts to base the rules for enslavement in Islamic law and uses quotes from the Prophet Mohamed to claim that Isis fighters should show both kindness and cruelty to prisoners.

It states that enslaved women should not be separated from their children, but it also justifies Isis fighters’ rape of female slaves.

Reuters states it has not been able to independently verify the authenticity of the documents, many of which hold religious rulings such as fatwas or advice on when to fund travel for jihad, while others provide an outline for the different diwans or departments held within Isis.

The treatment of slaves appears to come under the department of “war spoils,” the news agency reported.

US officials told Reuters the documents have been integral to understanding the machinations of a once-small group of terrorists and its growth into a complex bureaucratic organisation that manages territories and revenue streams.

“This really kinds of brings it out,” Brett McGurk, President Obama’s special envoy for the anti-IS coalition told Reuters. “The level of bureaucratization, organisation, the diwans, the committees.”

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