Jurgen Klopp accepts Adam Lallana's apology for extraordinary miss against Manchester City

Lallana felt the need to apologise to Klopp after wasting a chance to win the game late on, but Klopp told the winger he should not say sorry because his overall performance was 'outstanding'

Miguel Delaney
Etihad Stadium
Sunday 19 March 2017 20:28
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Lallana spurned a fine opportunity to win the game
Lallana spurned a fine opportunity to win the game

Adam Lallana apologised to Jurgen Klopp after his sensational miss in Liverpool’s 1-1 draw at Manchester City, the German manager has revealed, while also insisting he had no reason to say sorry because of an “outstanding” performance. Klopp also put the moment down to fatigue, adding that the player is one of the most technically.

Lallana was presented with a supreme chance to win the game on 80 minutes, when Robert Firmino crossed for him with the entire goal at his mercy from just yards out, only for the 28-year-old to completely miskick.

“Obviously, he’s one of he best if not the best player technical-wise I’ve ever worked with,” Klopp said. “If he can’t in this moment, obviously it’s because he worked so hard beforehand. The goalie was quite impressive also or he [Lallana] was surprised we played football like this [the move that set up the chance]. After the game, he said sorry. I said ‘why?’ There’s no reason he has to say sorry, as his performance was outstanding.

“”I thought, 10 minutes to go, ‘come on close the game’. Then, of course, Adam’s opportunity, really in this moment with a lot of kilometres in your legs. All these situations, I cannot forget them, but I can still remember Sergio Aguero in the six-yard box in the sky. That happens not too often.”

Klopp declared himself generally satisfied with the point, saying “you cannot run around after a draw at Manchester City”, but had some quibbles about some of the refereeing decisions, insisting his side could have had more penalties than the one James Milner scored just after half-time.

He particularly pointed to the moment in the first half when Sadio Mane was through on goal, only to go down under pressure from Nicolas Otamendi.

“We could have scored once or twice,” the German said. “A lot of penalties in the game. What can I say, I cannot change it. It could have been a red card, Sadio’s situation, he was away and Otamendi couldn’t catch him. But the game is positive. Of course it’s the way you have to play against good sides.”

When asked about Pep Guardiola’s comments that City’s comeback was one of the proudest of his career, Klopp quipped: "He is Spanish. They are more emotional than the Germans."

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