Airport security let the cat out of the bag
Airport security let the cat out of the bag

Couple ‘totally shocked’ after discovering stowaway cat in luggage for New York trip

Pair had no idea Candy had come along for the ride

Helen Coffey
Thursday 17 October 2019 13:19
Comments

A couple were “totally shocked” when they were pulled aside at airport security due to a stowaway cat.

Nick and Voirrey Coole were on their way from the Isle of Man to New York to celebrate Nick’s 40th birthday when one of their bags was targeted for extra checks.

The pair thought they’d left the bag empty in order to bring back souvenirs and gifts but, unbeknown to them, Candy, one of their three cats, had climbed inside.

“We were totally shocked,” said Nick. “She must have snuck into the bag before we left for the airport, but we didn’t hear or feel her at all on the journey there.”

The couple first knew something was amiss when they were pulled into an interrogation room.

“Airport security were all very puzzled and repeatedly asked us if the bag was ours after it had been through the scanner,” said Nick.

“We ran out of ideas for what it could have been, and my wife even asked them, ‘It’s not a cat is it?’” The Cooles were worried about what might happen next, but staff decided not to prosecute and they were able to still make their flight.

“My wife’s father, Barry, came to pick [Candy] up and she’s now back at home being looked after while we enjoy our trip,” Nick said.

It’s not the first time a stowaway animal has caused trouble for those travelling by plane.

In June 2019, a man accidentally carried a snake onboard a flight from Florida to Hawaii.

The 20-year-old passenger only discovered the reptile had stowed away in his bag when it slithered out of his rucksack once he’d arrived at a holiday rental property in Pukalani, Maui.

Support free-thinking journalism and attend Independent events

About 30cm long and 63mm in diameter, the black racer snake was non-venomous, according to the US Department of Agriculture.

However, snakes are illegal in Hawaii as they have no natural predators and pose a threat to indigenous species.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in