Bernard Haitink: A maestro passes on his baton to the next generation

It's tough to make it as a conductor – so when 20 young stars were asked to perform for the great Bernard Haitink, the pressure was on.  reports

It's a training experience like no other. Twenty of the world's brightest young conductors have come to the Lucerne Festival, Switzerland, hoping to be chosen for a masterclass with Bernard Haitink. Of those 20, seven make the final cut. Their task: in front of the veteran Dutch maestro and a fascinated public, they must conduct the Lucerne Festival Orchestra.

There, though, any resemblance to The Apprentice ends. This is not a competition and it's anything but cut-throat. All 20 twentysomethings, selected from 150 applicants, listen to the course; they all have a chance to conduct, not just the final seven. It is like Hogwarts for conductors, with Haitink, a legend in his own lifetime, serving as benevolent Dumbledore to the lot.

"I supervise them, give them my ideas and see if it suits them and if it helps them," Haitink, 83, remarks with characteristic self-deprecation. "I can't work miracles. But there are so many wrong ideas about this profession that it doesn't do any harm when a conductor who has a certain amount of experience tries to share it with younger people. It takes an enormous amount of energy, but I enjoy it."

Would-be conductors are at a disadvantage compared to instrumentalists: they can't practise easily because their instrument consists of 50-80 highly trained humans. That gives this course extra value even before Haitink has said a word.

Each participant has prepared four set works: Beethoven's Eroica Symphony, Schumann's Manfred Overture, the first movement of Bruckner's Symphony No 7 and Ravel's Mother Goose Suite. The chosen seven each have half an hour per day to strut their stuff.

"Maestro Haitink works with each of us as an individual, trying to bring out the best in everyone," says Gad Kadosh, 27, a French-Israeli conductor currently working as a vocal coach at the Theater für Niedersachsen, Hildesheim. "

Haitink's techniques certainly keep the youngsters on their toes. Usually (to generalise) a conductor gives the beat with his/her right hand, using the left to aid direction and amplify expression. Having decided that Anton Torbeev is using his left hand to excess, Haitink grabs his wrist in mid flow: the Russian student must finish the piece with his right hand alone. Then, with Kadosh, Haitink does the opposite, asking him to conduct only with his left; the result sounds marvellous, apparently to Kadosh's own surprise. Another student is startled when Haitink removes the score from under his nose halfway through a piece: he must continue from memory. "I could see that you know it," Haitink explains afterwards. "Looking at the score was distracting you. Have confidence!"

In the most common traps, the practicality of Haitink's advice proves its worth. "Not so holy," he says, stopping a student after a few phrases of Bruckner. The massive Seventh Symphony's opening inspires too much reverence; if the tempi slouch, the energy will soon flag. Haitink gently encourages him to think less of the heavens and more of the mountains. He takes the baton and demonstrates: at once the sound changes, the music becoming supple and vivid. "It's a long symphony," he points out. "Don't make the brass play full out even more than they are – they will be exhausted halfway through."

Then there's a recurrent question about focusing movement. "Don't move so much," Haitink exhorts a student whose flailing limbs are not helping the orchestra: a particular flute is late every time. "Concentrate the energy."

Isn't it alarming to feel Haitink's eye upon your every move? "Not at all," declares Zoi Tsokanou from Greece, the only girl in the top seven. "His energy is all about, 'let's make lovely music'. He gives us a lot of trust and a lot of love – there's no need to be afraid." Her animation and assurance in the Schumann overture inspire the orchestra into giving her a spontaneous round of applause.

Jonathan Mann, from the UK, says the course has been "one of the most exciting experiences of my life so far". He has already started his own orchestra, the Cardiff Sinfonietta. What does he feel he's learning here?

"Maestro Haitink mentioned that sometimes the simple things are the hardest to do," he says. "Holding a pause a little longer or getting a really quiet sound from the orchestra – can make the difference between a good performance and a great one."

Another Brit, Duncan Ward, at 22 years old the youngest in the final 20, is asked to run through the Schumann one afternoon. Having studied with (among others) Ravi Shankar in California, Ward especially enjoys Haitink's anecdotes about the great conductors of the past, such as Bruno Walter and Willem Mengelberg: "The Indian tradition passes everything down aurally from guru to pupil," he points out. "This is a little similar – the sense of a contact point with those great figures is fabulous."

The summer season of the Lucerne Festival opens on 8 August including further conducting masterclasses (www.lucernefestival.ch); Bernard Haitink conducts the Vienna Philharmonic on tour this summer and will be at the Proms and in Lucerne in September

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Thomas carried Lady Edith over the flames in her bedroom in Downton Abbey series five

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Ben Affleck as Nick Dunne, seated next to a picture of his missing wife Amy, played by Rosamund Pike

film
Arts and Entertainment
Rachel, Chandler and Ross try to get Ross's sofa up the stairs in the famous 'Pivot!' scene

Friends 20th anniversary
Arts and Entertainment
Lena Dunham

books
Arts and Entertainment
A bit rich: Maggie Smith in Downton Abbey

There’s revolution in the air, but one lady’s not for turning

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Chloe-Jasmine Whicello impressed the judges and the audience at Wembley Arena with a sultry performance
TVReview: Who'd have known Simon was such a Roger Rabbit fan?
Arts and Entertainment
Nick Frost will star in the Doctor Who 2014 Christmas special

TV
Arts and Entertainment
A spell in the sun: Emma Stone and Colin Firth star in ‘Magic in the Moonlight’
filmReview: Magic In The Moonlight
Arts and Entertainment
Friends is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year
TV
Arts and Entertainment
Ben Whishaw is replacing Colin Firth as the voice of Paddington Bear

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Actor and director Zach Braff

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Maisie Williams plays 'bad ass' Arya Stark in Game of Thrones

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Liam Neeson said he wouldn't

TV
Arts and Entertainment

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Meera Syal was a member of the team that created Goodness Gracious Me

TV
Arts and Entertainment
The former Doctor Who actor is to play a vicar is search of a wife

film
Arts and Entertainment

music
Arts and Entertainment
Pointless host Alexander Armstrong will voice Danger Mouse on CBBC

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Pharrell dismissed the controversy surrounding

music
Arts and Entertainment
Jack Huston is the new Ben-Hur

film
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Secret politics of the weekly shop

    The politics of the weekly shop

    New app reveals political leanings of food companies
    Beam me up, Scottie!

    Beam me up, Scottie!

    Celebrity Trekkies from Alex Salmond to Barack Obama
    Beware Wet Paint: The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition

    Beware Wet Paint

    The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition
    Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

    Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

    Can 'The Endless River' carry on the tradition?
    Sanctuary for the suicidal

    Sanctuary for the suicidal

    One mother's story of how London charity Maytree helped her son with his depression
    A roller-coaster tale from the 'voice of a generation'

    Not That Kind of Girl:

    A roller-coaster tale from 'voice of a generation' Lena Dunham
    London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice. In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence

    London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice

    In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence
    Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with Malcolm McLaren

    Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with McLaren

    Designer 'felt pressured' into going out with Sex Pistols manager
    Jourdan Dunn: Model mother

    Model mother

    Jordan Dunn became one of the best-paid models in the world
    Apple still coolest brand – despite U2 PR disaster

    Apple still the coolest brand

    Despite PR disaster of free U2 album
    Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

    Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

    Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
    Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

    Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

    The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
    The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

    Scrambled eggs and LSD

    Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
    'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

    'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

    Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
    Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

    New leading ladies of dance fight back

    How female vocalists are now writing their own hits