Today's letter from the Editor
Today's Matrices
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Bookkeeper / Office Co-ordinator

£9 per hour: Recruitment Genius: This role is based within a small family run ...

Recruitment Genius: Designer - Print & Digital

£28000 - £32000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This Design and marketing agenc...

Recruitment Genius: Quantity Surveyor

£46000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This property investment firm are lookin...

Recruitment Genius: Telesales / Telemarketing Executive - OTE £30k / £35k plus

£18000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This company specialises provid...

Page 3 Profile: Nicky Philipps, royal artist

That can’t be the Queen?

You’d better believe it. Nicky Philipps, who painted an acclaimed double portrait of Princes William and Harry four years ago, has now turned her hand to the Queen. A small segment of the full portrait, which was commissioned by Royal Mail, appears on a new first class stamp to mark the 60th anniversary of the Queen’s coronation. To produce the painting, the 48-year-old artist had three hour-long sittings with Her Majesty in Buckingham Palace.

She could have done with longer

According to Royal Mail chief executive Moya Greene, “the Queen’s image is one of the most recognisable in the world”. You wouldn’t know it from this picture though, which might be the volunteer from your local Oxfam. “It’s Thatcher meets Rumpole of the Bailey meets Hogarth, in Hogarthian England, all the worse or perhaps the better for a glug of gin,” art critic Estelle Lovatt said. No closer to pinning down the likeness was David Lee, editor of art magazine The Jackdaw, who cruelly joked that it resembled “a bloke wearing a wig and earrings” and had a “hint of Churchill about it”. Philipps said “you can’t please everyone”, inviting critics of the stamp to come and see it in the flesh.

No, thank you

In fairness, Philipps’s portrait of the princes, which hangs in the National Portrait Gallery, is brilliant. Prince Harry complained that Philipps had made him “more ginger than I am in real life” while giving his brother “more hair”, but the stern, disapproving-older-brother look on the Duke of Cambridge’s face is a joy.

The royals don’t have much luck with these portraits, do they?

Paul Elmsley was vilified for his “rotten” portrait of Kate Middleton. One critic even said the duchess’s nose resembled that of former cricketer Ian Botham. Earlier this year, Dan Llywelyn Hall’s expressionist take on the queen was lambasted as a “hideous cartoon” that looked like a Spitting Image puppet.

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Career Services

Day In a Page

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003