Today's letter from the Editor
Today's Matrices
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Junior Web Designer - Client Liaison

£6 per hour: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity to join a gro...

Recruitment Genius: Service Delivery Manager

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: A Service Delivery Manager is required to join...

Recruitment Genius: Massage Therapist / Sports Therapist

£12000 - £24000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A opportunity has arisen for a ...

Ashdown Group: Practice Accountant - Bournemouth - £38,000

£32000 - £38000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A successful accountancy practice in...

Page 3 Profile: Sir Malcolm Ross, member of the Royal household

The head of Operation True Blue?

He is indeed. Sir Malcolm has led a committee of officials from Buckingham Palace, the Metropolitan Police and Parliament on the arrangements for Margaret Thatcher’s funeral next Wednesday. He is said to have taken the plans from the “frayed” state they were in four years ago to the streamlined guidelines that we have today.

Why bring in Sir Malcolm?

He is famed for his discretion, as you might expect from someone who is accustomed to working with the Royal Family. Eton – and Sandhurst-educated, he joined the Royal Household in 1987 as Assistant Comptroller of the Lord Chamberlain’s Office and Management Auditor, working his way up to becoming Master of the Household of the Prince of Wales in 2006. He was responsible for organising the funerals of Diana, Princess of Wales and the Queen Mother, and it was because of this experience that he was chosen to steer one of the most controversial services in recent memory.

I certainly hadn’t heard any rumours about it until this week.

It is said that Sir Malcolm held the plans for the Queen Mother’s funeral in his briefcase for 17 years, so keeping Margaret Thatcher’s plans under lock and key must have been easy in comparison. Speculation raged for years over whether she should be granted a state funeral, but it was decided this would not be the case quite early on.

There is, of course, one element he can’t control.

It seems inevitable that protesters will aim to make their presence felt next week. Sir Malcolm felt it necessary to involve the police unusually early on. He would discuss plans with Mark and Carol Thatcher and the former Prime Minister’s senior adviser Mark Worthington before regrouping the committee to agree the best plan of action. If something goes awry, it’s unlikely to be Sir Malcolm’s fault.

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Career Services

Day In a Page

No postcode? No vote

Floating voters

How living on a houseboat meant I didn't officially 'exist'
Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin

By Reason of Insanity

Louis Theroux's affable Englishman routine begins to wear thin
Power dressing is back – but no shoulderpads!

Power dressing is back

But banish all thoughts of Eighties shoulderpads
Spanish stone-age cave paintings 'under threat' after being re-opened to the public

Spanish stone-age cave paintings in Altamira 'under threat'

Caves were re-opened to the public
'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'

Vince Cable interview

'I was the bookies’ favourite to be first to leave the Cabinet'
Election 2015: How many of the Government's coalition agreement promises have been kept?

Promises, promises

But how many coalition agreement pledges have been kept?
The Gaza fisherman who built his own reef - and was shot dead there by an Israeli gunboat

The death of a Gaza fisherman

He built his own reef, and was fatally shot there by an Israeli gunboat
Saudi Arabia's airstrikes in Yemen are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Saudi airstrikes are fuelling the Gulf's fire

Arab intervention in Yemen risks entrenching Sunni-Shia divide and handing a victory to Isis, says Patrick Cockburn
Zayn Malik's departure from One Direction shows the perils of fame in the age of social media

The only direction Zayn could go

We wince at the anguish of One Direction's fans, but Malik's departure shows the perils of fame in the age of social media
Young Magician of the Year 2015: Meet the schoolgirl from Newcastle who has her heart set on being the competition's first female winner

Spells like teen spirit

A 16-year-old from Newcastle has set her heart on being the first female to win Young Magician of the Year. Jonathan Owen meets her
Jonathan Anderson: If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

If fashion is a cycle, this young man knows just how to ride it

British designer Jonathan Anderson is putting his stamp on venerable house Loewe
Number plates scheme could provide a licence to offend in the land of the free

Licence to offend in the land of the free

Cash-strapped states have hit on a way of making money out of drivers that may be in collision with the First Amendment, says Rupert Cornwell
From farm to fork: Meet the Cornish fishermen, vegetable-growers and butchers causing a stir in London's top restaurants

From farm to fork in Cornwall

One man is bringing together Cornwall's most accomplished growers, fishermen and butchers with London's best chefs to put the finest, freshest produce on the plates of some of the country’s best restaurants
Robert Parker interview: The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes

Robert Parker interview

The world's top wine critic on tasting 10,000 bottles a year, absurd drinking notes and New World wannabes
Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

Don't believe the stereotype - or should you?

We exaggerate regional traits and turn them into jokes - and those on the receiving end are in on it too, says DJ Taylor