Rhodri Marsden: the embodiment of irresistible masculinity, obviously

Rhodri Marsden: The conflicted reality of the 'digital dashboard' is driving me crazy

While I was on holiday in Sydney last September, I got into a taxi with a dashboard festooned with five mobile devices, hanging off a variety of mounts, and all presumably providing critical information to the driver.

Video stars: top Viners King Bach, Jerome Jarre and Nash Grier in various online skits and pranks

Famous for six seconds: The celebrities of Vine

Twitter’s video app, Vine, only lets its users make the shortest of films. Still, that hasn’t stopped its stars from turning brief encounters into a high-profile career

Perfect pitch: Steve Jobs, left, and Apple's president John Sculley with the new Macintosh personal computer in New York in 1984

Apple Mac at 30: How Steve Jobs launched a revolution in home computing - and founded an army of passionate devotees

"I don't know a single person who watches the Super Bowl," said a worried Steve Jobs, then just 28 years old. The event he was referring to commanded a television audience of more than 80 million at the time, but Jobs' nervousness at the prospect of Apple spending $1.6m (£1m) to secure two 60-second TV ad slots during the game was understandable. After all, the kind of computers that Apple manufactured just didn't belong in the home of the average football fan; its pioneering Lisa machine was priced at an eye-watering $10,000, the equivalent to more than $23,000 (£14,000) today.

Rhodri Marsden: We have no choice but to ride out the upgrade cycle of life

A friend of mine is, in computing terms at least, stuck in 2005, a time when Tony Blair was still Prime Minister, Sven-Goran Eriksson was still the England manager and people were buying records by Crazy Frog.

On the agenda: Imagine Children's Festival; The Voice; Googlebox; gender neutral toys

Middle-class problems: Gender neutral toys

The number crunch: Will Big Data transform your life - or make it a misery?

The age of Big Data is upon us. Fuelled by an incendiary mix of overblown claims and dire warnings, the public debate over the handling and exploitation of digital information on an astronomically large scale has been framed in stark terms: on one side are transformative forces that could immeasurably improve the human condition; on the other, powers so subversive and toxic that a catastrophic erosion of fundamental liberties looks inevitable.

On reflection: a woman meditates the traditional way

Rhodri Marsden: Home is where the heart of absurd technology is but is the automation revolution just pointless frippery?

It probably contravenes some unwritten rule to begin a light-hearted examination of the week in technology with a reference to Jimmy Savile, but a few days ago I remembered an episode of Jim'll Fix It in the 1980s where some lucky youngster had his room kitted out with all the latest gadgets from the Ideal Home Show, including some automated curtains. These curtains elicited gasps of wonder from my teenage self as I entertained the notion that, in the future, we'd be relieved of the endless, life-sapping drudgery of having to drag light pieces of material along a rail, sometimes as frequently as twice a day.

From bacterial robots to synthetic blood cells: The biotech boom at British universities

Imagine bacteria that eats pollution in water or can recycle gold from electronics - the scope of synthetic biology is practically limitless

Sony's Xperia Z1 Compact takes strong design and makes it smaller

The hits of CES: From Sony's Xperia Z1 Compact to the Parrot Jumping Sumo, the show didn't disappoint

Our technology expert reflects on this year’s Consumer Electronics Show

Samsung showed off an 85in television that can be either flat or curved

CES: is gadgets flaunting their curves innovation?

Geek mythology

Keep on trucking: driverless trucks could soon be a common sight on the world's roads

Autonomous vehicles: How safe are trucks without human drivers?

Experiments are already under way testing out trucks that can drive themselves. But how safe will these juggernauts be without a human at the helm? Mark Piesing reports

Rhodri Marsden buys his 'milibit' online

Get a piece of the Bitcoin action: How easy is it to lay your hands on the virtual currency?

'The process was like wagering cash on a dull greyhound race and then having to jump through hoops to claim the winnings'

Rhodri Marsden: Smartphone users moan about battery life but don't choose mobiles with the longest

My current phone has been my trusty companion, faithful friend and indispensable conduit to the outside world for 23 months now. In four weeks, I'll be urgently embarking on the biennial horror of the upgrade process – not because I'm desperate to experience the thrill of developments such as fingerprint readers, virtual surround sound or support for communicating in Swahili, but because my relationship with my phone's battery has reached breaking point. We're barely speaking. It's not putting in anywhere near the effort that it used to, and despite regular admonishment, it refuses to mend its ways. Only today, I cursed its uselessness as it counted down from 100 per cent to 0 per cent at record-breaking speed, and I vowed to consign it to an unecological landfill grave as soon as possible.

Goggle box: the blocky looks of the Oculus Rift belie the breath-taking experience of what the wearer sees

Virtual reality just got real: Could the Oculus Rift headset change the way we play, work and learn?

Cyrus Nemati tries out the headset that has far-reaching implications beyond the world of video gaming

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