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Obituary: Hilary Tindall

Hilary Tindall, actress, born Manchester 1936, married 1963 Robin Lowe (one son, one daughter), died Selborne Hampshire 5 December 1992.

HILARY TINDALL became one of television's most popular actresses when she played Ann Hammond in the successful television series The Brothers which ran from 1972 to 1974 (and is now being repeated on UK Gold).

When Tindall won the role of Ann Hammond she little realised that it would be a turning-point in her career. Appearing in 50 episodes, she played the part of the bored and restless wife married to one of the brothers of the family- owned road-haulage company, and captured the imagination of the viewers with her adulterous affairs.

It was a part that afforded her a full range of emotions and was to make her a star wherever the series was sold in Europe and the Far East. Her family life precluded her from undertaking the many offers of work abroad which were offered at the time.

Hilary Tindall was born in Manchester and trained at RADA. Her first appearance on the professional stage was at Richmond Theatre, and she went on to play the juvenile lead in William Douglas-Home's controversial comedy Aunt Edwina at the Fortune Theatre. This was followed by the lead in A Trip to the Castle at the Arts Theatre in 1960, where she played opposite Terence Stamp. Television roles at that time included Dear Octopus, with Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies, and The Tempest, with Michael Redgrave. Leading roles followed at the Old Vic, and she appeared in the American musical Little Mary Sunshine at the Comedy in 1962.

After her success in The Brothers, Tindall was offered a starring role in a Swedish television serial, The Ship Owner. The Brothers had been a big hit in Sweden and she became an overnight celebrity there with her new series. She returned to the stage in Britain with Parent's Day, at the Globe, and found herself in great demand, starring in several national tours of plays including Verdict, The Gentle Hook, My Cousin Rachel, The Owl and The Pussy Cat and Getting Married.

Tindall returned to musicals and starred in A Little Night Music and Company, at Colchester, and South Pacific, at the Connaught. More television followed including: Tales of the Unexpected, A Kind of Loving, The Max Headroom Show and, her last appearance, an episode of Maigret. Her last stage appearances were Dangerous Obsession (1988), at the Fortune, The Heiress (1989), at Chichester, and How The Other Half Loves (1990), at Leatherhead.

Hilary Tindall was married to Robin Lowe, the literary agent, and had two children, Kate and Julian. She was a delightful actress whose vivacity and charm endeared her to everybody she worked for.

(Photograph omitted)