Good Will Hunting bench in Boston gets quote tributes to Robin Williams from fans

"Your move, chief"

Robin Williams has been honoured at the spot where he touched the most hearts during his rich and eccentric career, with fans scrawling Good Will Hunting quotes by the bench in Boston where his character so articulately conveyed the beauty of worldly experience and the simple magnificence of love.

Read the bench scene transcript

The actor died of a suspected suicide at his home in northern California last night at the age of 63.

The Oscar-winning Good Will Hunting is perhaps his most cherished film, in which he played Sean Maguire, a psychiatrist and widower who helps Matt Damon's brilliant but troubled young janitor Will find his way in the world.

"Your move, chief," one fan quoted on the paving in front of the bench, echoing the nickname Sean would sarcastically call his patient.

The bench shortly after the news of Williams' death broke

"Sorry guys, I went to see about a girl," another wrote, Damon's line at the film's denouement which proved that Sean's faith in love had rubbed off on him.

With flowers laid on it, the bench situated in Boston Public Garden is becoming a memorial to the actor for those choosing to focus on his life rather than his death, in a similar way to Tony Soprano's booth which was 'reserved' following James Gandolfini's death last year.

Read more: Robin Williams dies: A comic genius with equal ability to wring tears from his audience
Read more: Robin Williams, dressed as Mrs Doubtfire, walks into a sex shop…

"Bangarang" was also scrawled beside the bench, in reference to the movie Hook.

President Obama also mentioned the Lost Boys' war cry in a statement about Williams he made last night.

"Robin Williams was an airman, a doctor, a genie, a nanny, a president, a professor, a bangarang Peter Pan and everything in between. But he was one of a kind. He arrived in our lives as an alien - but he ended up touching every element of the human spirit," he said.

 

"He made us laugh. He made us cry. He gave his immeasurable talent freely and generously to those who needed it most - from our troops stationed abroad to the marginalised on our own streets. The Obama family offers our condolences to Robin's family, his friends, and everyone who found their voice and their verse thanks to Robin Williams."

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