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Shia LaBeouf receiving treatment for alcoholism but is not in rehab

The actor is “voluntarily” being treated for alcoholism, but is not in rehab

Shia LaBeouf is receiving treatment for alcoholism, his publicist Melissa Kates confirmed.

The actor has voluntarily asked for outpatient care to deal with his drinking addiction, following his arrest on 26 June.

However, he has not checked into a rehabilitation clinic, despite previous speculation.

“Contrary to previous erroneous reports, Shia LaBeouf has not checked into a rehabilitation facility but he is voluntarily receiving treatment for alcohol addiction,” said Kates.

“He understands that these recent actions are a symptom of a larger health problem and he has taken the first of many necessary steps towards recovery.”

The actor was arrested last week after disrupting a Broadway production of Cabaret, starring Michelle Williams. He was charged with harassment, disorderly conduct and criminal trespassing after he began yelling at security guards and even slapping Alan Cumming’s bottom. He was handcuffed by officers and led away tearfully.

He was released on 27 July and will appear in court over the incident on 24 July.

New York Police Department spokesperson George Tsourovakas said: “He was being rather difficult and combative, verbally... To the point where security guards asked him to please leave the premises and he refused. Police were called and he was detained and arrested.”

Over the past few years, LaBeouf has been arrested three times – once for criminal trespassing, another for assault with a deadly weapon and also for drink-driving.

His erratic behaviour reached a crescendo in February when he wore a brown paper bag, over his head to the premiere of Lars von Trier film Nyphomaniac, featuring the words: ‘I am not famous anymore.’

In January, he announced that he was retiring from public life after being accused of plagiarising graphic novelist Daniel Clowes' work in a short film called Howard Cantour.com that he made for Cannes Film Festival last year.