Attorney General to review sentence given to a man who killed innocent pedestrian with a single punch after cycling row

Family had expressed outrage over four-and-a-half year jail term for Lewis Gill

The Attorney General is to review the four-and-a-half-year sentence given to a man who killed a pedestrian with a single punch over a dispute about cycling on the pavement.

Dominic Grieve is considering whether to refer the jail term handed to Lewis Gill, 20, for killing 40-year-old Andrew Young to the Court of Appeal for being unduly lenient, his office confirmed today.

Gill, from Sutton, Surrey, was jailed for four-and-a-half years by Salisbury Crown Court on Friday.

Legal experts said he could be free within two.

Mr Young, who suffered from Asperger syndrome, was knocked to the ground in the attack and suffered a fatal blow to the head.

His mother Pamela, 71, had earlier condemned the verdict as a "joke".

"I saw the CCTV footage in court and you can see that Andrew didn't cause Lewis Gill any harm," she told Bournemouth News and Picture Service press agency.

Lewis Gill killed Asperger sufferer Andrew Young in the attack last year Lewis Gill killed Asperger sufferer Andrew Young in the attack last year "I sat with him when he died. I wish that awful man who took my son away had pleaded not guilty so he would have got a longer sentence.

"The sentence is an absolute joke. I'm a committed Christian but I think that if someone takes a life they should be prepared to forfeit their own.

"There have been many people who have committed manslaughter or murder in this country and they never even serve a full sentence."

On Wednesday the Attorney General's Office tweeted that it had received a number of requests to review the sentence.

"Have received a number of requests to review the manslaughter sentence of Lewis Gill. Only takes one request and process now started," it said.

Dominic Grieve has until 21 March to decide whether to refer the sentence to the Court of Appeal.

A statement made by Mr Young’s family said they were pleased the sentence was being looked at again. 

"When we first heard that Gill was given a four year sentence we thought it was too short and expected him to get more than that. It's ridiculous,” it said. 

"He (Gill) didn't mean to kill him so a life sentence would have been extreme but he deserves more than what he was given.

"Looking at his criminal record he is obviously a trouble maker and we were hoping he would get about seven or eight years.

"A sentence so short might mean that he could do something else dangerous in the future.

"We are pleased that the Attorney General is reviewing the sentence as people like that never really seem to learn."

Released CCTV footage shows the attack, which took place outside the Tesco Metro store on Charminster Road, Bournemouth, at 4.25pm on 6 November last year.

The video shows Mr Young talking to an acquaintance of Gill’s about his cycling on the pavement.

The cyclist rides off, but moments later Gill is seen punching Mr Young in the face without provocation, the court was told.

Mr Young is seen falling backwards and striking his head on the road.

Gill, from Sutton, Surrey, is then seen walking away as Mr Young remains motionless on the ground.

He died the next day at Southampton hospital.

Gill pleaded guilty to manslaughter.

Steven Perian, defending, said Gill had felt threatened by Mr Young, but judge Keith Cutler rejected the claim.

In passing sentence, Judge Cutler explained why he was sentencing Gill to only four years. 

He said: "What I have had to look at is what was in your mind at the time you threw that punch. 

"You wanted to cause some injury to Mr Young. If you wanted to cause grievous bodily harm it would have been a murder charge. 

"I bear in mind your early guilty plea. I accept there is no pre-meditated element and provocation does exist."

Gill was also sentenced to two three-month prison terms to run consecutively after committing the crime while on a suspended sentence for robbery and for handling stolen goods.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement