Hacking trial: Andy Coulson and Clive Goodman to face retrial over bribery plot charges

Former NOTW editor Coulson already faces jail after jury at Old Bailey found him guilty of plotting to hack phones

Former No 10 spin doctor Andy Coulson's legal woes continued today when he was told he would face a re-trial over charges of plotting to bribe public officials while he was an editor at the News of the World.

Last week a jury was discharged after it failed to agree on whether Coulson, 46, and ex-NotW royal editor Clive Goodman, 56, conspired to commit misconduct in public office by paying police officers for two royal directories.

But today the Crown Prosecution Service announced it would still pursue both defendants over the two counts.

Prosecutor Andrew Edis QC said: “The CPS has taken the position to proceed with the retrial.”

Coulson, of Charing in Kent, already faces jail after the jury found him guilty of plotting to hack phones at the NotW between 2000 and 2006 following the Old Bailey trial which went on for 139 days.

Goodman, of Addlestone, Surrey, pleaded guilty to phone hacking in 2006 and despite admitting his activities were more extensive than he had previously said, he will not face any further legal action over it.

Read more:
Coulson jury discharged after failing to reach verdict
Hacking trial: How the case was won and lost
Labour asks why Andy Coulson wasn’t properly vetted

Coulson was joined in the dock by private detective Glenn Mulcaire and four former NotW journalists who have all admitted their part in phone hacking at hearings before the trial began.

Lawyers are expected to mitigate for the defendants before Mr Justice Saunders hands down sentences on Friday.

Four senior staff “utterly corrupted” the NotW the highest level, the court heard.

Coulson was being sentenced alongside former colleagues Neville Thurlbeck, Greg Miskiw and James Weatherup who have all admitted their part in the “systemic misconduct”.

Private detective Glenn Mulcaire also stood in the dock of the Old Bailey to be sentenced for his part in the criminal plot.

He was paid around half a million pounds to hack a list of victims which “read like a Who's Who of Britain”, the prosecutor said.

He added the defendants were responsible for corrupting the NotW at the highest level, the court heard.

He said: “Your lordship is dealing with four senior executives who were...employed at the NotW. There are three defendants who were at one time or another newsdesk editor at executive levels.

Video: David Cameron apologises over Andy Coulson

”The newsdesk editor job was described as being the hub or engine room of the paper therefore all of these four defendants can be described as highly paid and influential employees of a national newspaper.

“Between them these defendants utterly corrupted this newspaper which became at the highest level a criminal enterprise.” He went on: “This was systemic misconduct approved and participated in by the editor himself.”

Reporter Dan Evans, who has also admitted phone hacking, will be sentenced separately in late July, the court heard.

PA

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible