Izzadeen guilty of terror charges

Notorious Muslim activist Abu Izzadeen was today found guilty of fundraising for terrorists and inciting terrorism overseas.

Izzadeen was convicted at Kingston Crown Court at the end of a three-and-a-half month trial.



The outspoken 32-year-old former electrician, who once heckled former Home Secretary John Reid on live TV, was on trial with seven other men.



Five of them were also found guilty by the jury today after more than 22 hours of deliberations.



One other defendant was cleared and the jury failed to reach a verdict on another man.













Simon Keeler was convicted of the same two charges as Izzadeen, who stood trial under the name of Omar Brooks.



Abdul Saleem, 32, and Ibrahim Hassan, 25, were convicted of inciting terrorism but cleared of fundraising for terrorists.



Shah Jilal Hussain and Abdul Muhid, both 25, were found guilty of fundraising for terrorists.



Rajib Khan, 29, was cleared of the same charge. The jury failed to reach a verdict in respect of the charge of inciting terrorism overseas in his case.



They also failed to reach a verdict in respect of Omar Zaheer, 28, also charged with the same offence.



The jury did not return a verdict on a third offence of encouraging terrorism faced by Izzadeen, who changed his name from Trevor Brooks after converting to Islam.













The charges related to the evening of 9 November, 2004 when US forces were locked in a fierce battle for the city of Fallujah in Iraq.

The city was being used as a base for al-Qa'ida terrorists and Sunni rebel forces but the American onslaught, coming as it did during the month of Ramadan, attracted fierce criticism.



Izzadeen and the other defendants gathered at the Regent's Park mosque to observe a holy day in the Muslim calendar.



Once there he, along with others, started to denounce the fighting in speeches made both inside the mosque and later, after a clash with the mosque authorities, out on the street.



But the court heard that their preaching quickly went much further than mere protest.



Prosecuting Jonathan Laidlaw said: "What occurred was that these eight men delivered or contributed to a series of speeches and appeals for money, and in the case of five of the defendants, for volunteers to join in the fight against coalition troops.



"The speeches became progressively more emotive and inflammatory and insulting in their tone."



The guilty men were all members of a controversial group called, Al-Muhajiroun.



Run by an extremist preacher, Omar Bakri, who has since left the country, the group believed in the creation of a Muslim state and the imposition of shariah law. They also support armed struggle to achieve their ends.



The group has now been disbanded and a number of the defendants, including Izzadeen, formed off-shoot organisations in its place which were subsequently banned by the government.

Suggested Topics
Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Day In a Page

Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project