Gamble for Africa: Mali mission sucks in 400 British troops

PM heads for Algeria as MPs warn conflict in region could drag on 'for years'

Britain’s growing military commitment to Mali and West Africa is likely to pass 400 within a matter of weeks, sparking fears of “mission creep” and cross-party criticism that UK forces are being sucked into a Vietnam-style conflict without a defined exit strategy.

A fortnight ago David Cameron promised that Britain would only send “tens, not hundreds” of troops to help the French-led operation. That prediction from the Prime Minister has been shredded as UK assistance to the French-led operation has significantly increased.

The growing importance of the unrest in West Africa was highlighted last night when Downing Street announced the PM would be flying to Algeria tomorrow for urgent talks with Prime Minister, Abdelmalek Sellal.

Mr Cameron was already scheduled to attend a development conference in Monrovia, Liberia, but added the Algerian meeting following the recent hostage crisis at the Amenas gas plant which left six Britons and 47 others dead.

Number 10 said the discussions were likely to include the military campaign in Mali, a neighbour-state to Algeria.

The Defence Secretary Phil Hammond was forced to make a statement to the Commons today admitting that troop numbers in the region would substantially rise with new support for an EU training mission in Mali and up to 200 additional personnel who will assist a United Nations-backed training programme for forces from neighbouring West African states.

UK military advisers are already in place helping the UN’s Africa-led International Support Mission to Mali (AFISMA). Ground and technical support teams for a Sentinel surveillance aircraft plus two C-17 transport planes protected by combat-ready troops from the RAF Regiment, have also been deployed.

Around 20 British personnel are in the Malian capital, Bamako, liaising with French forces that have already passed the 3500 mark. Further British military assistance in the form of a specialist ferry to help land French armoured vehicles at ports in Senegal or The Gambia, alongside the offer of expert personnel to help staff a joint UK-French logistics headquarters in Mali , is also being considered.

Britain’s national security adviser, Sir Kim Darroch, has been in Paris this week holding talks with his French counterparts. The talks – focused on France’s short-term military shopping list for Mali – suggest the UK’s role could grow.

In advance of Mr Hammond’s statement, a Ministry of Defence spokesman said the mission in Mali needed to be “flexible” and accepted that if circumstances changed and other countries did not contribute as predicted to the French-led operation, the UK’s role could widen further.

The Shadow Defence Secretary, Jim Murphy, told the Commons that the government needed to face “broader worries about mission creep” adding that the commitment to Mali had grown from lending to aircraft to the French to the “deployment of perhaps hundreds of troops.”

Mr Murphy said the British people “did not want to see this as another war that their country should not have been in.”

In the Commons two former defence secretaries voiced concern that the Mali operation was proceeding without having precise military goals.

Sir Malcolm Rifkind, defence secretary during the Bosnian war, called on the government to develop a “political strategy” for the region, to work with north and west African countries, and warned if this did not happen Britain could be drawn in years of “asymmetric conflict” – uneven guerrilla warfare - with Islamist forces.

Bob Ainsworth, in charge of defence in Gordon Brown’s government, warned against the dangers of UK heading into a conflict without knowing exactly how long the job would take.

The former cabinet minister, Frank Dobson, captured the mood of many MPs when he predicted that “Mali could become Britain’s Vietnam.”  The “American catastrophe in Vietnam,” said Mr Dobson, “started off with American troops in a training capacity.”

Bob Stewart, the Tory MP and former British Army Colonel who commanded UK in Bosnia, also warned against the dangers of “mission creep” and said there was currently a “grey area” over the role of troops deployed for training, but who nevertheless were armed and could yet face combat situations.

General Sir Mike Jackson, the former Chief of the General Staff, backed the government’s assessment of Mali’s importance. “What happens in the middle of nowhere – as Timbuktu used to be called – matters. If the Jihadists took over in Mali, it would not end there.”

Although Mr Hammond was forced to repeat that there was “no intention to deploy combat troops” and that so far there had been a “well-judged and well-leveraged intervention”, Downing Street appeared to be on the defensive after the statement from the defence secretary and refused to answer any questions that mentioned parallels with Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq.

Two conferences taking place today – one in Brussels and the other in Addis Ababa in Ethiopia – addressed the military needs of forces in Mali and in it neighbouring states.

African and western states attending the two gatherings, pledged more than $450m to aid the Mali operation. Japan, which lost 10 of its national in the Amenas attack, pledged $120m.

The current price tag for the operation is estimated at close to a $1 billion.

Discussions in Brussels focused on how a 500-strong training mission could be put together and sent to Mali within two weeks. Deployment of the EU’s battle group of 1700 troops has been ruled out.

France has so far not asked any western nations for ground troop support, but logistical, transport and intelligence help has widened from the UK to include forces from Germany and the United States.

Washington recently announced that it would operate specialist in-flight tankers to help refuel French fighters and bombers.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Arts and Entertainment
tv
Sport
Ojo Onaolapo celebrates winning the bronze medal
commonwealth games
Arts and Entertainment
Rock band Led Zeppelin in the early 1970s
musicLed Zeppelin to release alternative Stairway To Heaven after 43 years
Arts and Entertainment
Tracey Emin's 'My Bed' is returning to the Tate more than 15 years after it first caused shockwaves at the gallery
artTracey Emin's bed returns to the Tate after record sale
Environment
Neil Young performing at Hyde Park, London, earlier this month
environment
News
i100
News
Prince Harry is clearing enjoying the Commonwealth Games judging by this photo
people(a real one this time)
Sport
Lionel Messi looks on at the end of the final
football
Extras
indybest
News
Richard Norris in GQ
mediaGQ features photo shoot with man who underwent full face transplant
News
Gardai wait for the naked man, who had gone for a skinny dip in Belfast Lough
newsTwo skinny dippers threatened with inclusion on sex offenders’ register as naturists criminalised
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Project Coordinator

Competitive: The Green Recruitment Company: The Organisation: The Green Recrui...

Project Manager (HR)- Bristol - Upto £400 p/day

£350 - £400 per annum + competitive: Orgtel: Project Manager (specializing in ...

Embedded Linux Engineer

£40000 - £50000 per annum + competitive: Progressive Recruitment: Embedded Sof...

Senior Hardware Design Engineer - Broadcast

£50000 - £65000 per annum + Benefits: Progressive Recruitment: Working for a m...

Day In a Page

The children were playing in the street with toy guns. The air strikes were tragically real

The air strikes were tragically real

The children were playing in the street with toy guns
Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite – The British, as others see us

Britain as others see us

Boozy, ignorant, intolerant, but very polite
Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them altogether

Countries that don’t survey their tigers risk losing them

Jonathon Porritt sounds the alarm
How did our legends really begin?

How did our legends really begin?

Applying the theory of evolution to the world's many mythologies
Watch out: Lambrusco is back on the menu

Lambrusco is back on the menu

Naff Seventies corner-shop staple is this year's Aperol Spritz
A new Russian revolution: Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc

A new Russian revolution

Cracks start to appear in Putin’s Kremlin power bloc
Eugene de Kock: Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

Apartheid’s sadistic killer that his country cannot forgive

The debate rages in South Africa over whether Eugene de Kock should ever be released from jail
Standing my ground: If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?

Standing my ground

If sitting is bad for your health, what happens when you stay on your feet for a whole month?
Commonwealth Games 2014: Dai Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Greene prays for chance to rebuild after injury agony

Welsh hurdler was World, European and Commonwealth champion, but then the injuries crept in
Israel-Gaza conflict: Secret report helps Israelis to hide facts

Patrick Cockburn: Secret report helps Israel to hide facts

The slickness of Israel's spokesmen is rooted in directions set down by pollster Frank Luntz
The man who dared to go on holiday

The man who dared to go on holiday

New York's mayor has taken a vacation - in a nation that has still to enforce paid leave, it caused quite a stir, reports Rupert Cornwell
Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business, from Sarah Millican to Marcus Brigstocke

Best comedians: How the professionals go about their funny business

For all those wanting to know how stand-ups keep standing, here are some of the best moments
The Guest List 2014: Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks

The Guest List 2014

Forget the Man Booker longlist, Literary Editor Katy Guest offers her alternative picks
Jokes on Hollywood: 'With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on'

Jokes on Hollywood

With comedy film audiences shrinking, it’s time to move on