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UK Politics

UKIP accused of hypocrisy after they use Eastern European workers to distribute party leaflets

Owner of UKIP's leafleting company Fast Leaflet says workforce is predominantly from Eastern Europe

UKIP the political party that distributes flyers that claim "British workers are hit hard by unlimited foreign labour” have been labeled as hypocrites after it was found that those distributing these flyers were Eastern European.

According to Andrew Spalis, the co-owner of leafleting firm Fast Leaflet, the company used by UKIP to distribute party literature, most of those that work as part of his team are originally from Eastern Europe and have moved to Britain in search of work.

Spalis said the company which covers London and the South East has only been in business in its current state for a few months but already has a workforce that is predominantly from Eastern Europe.

Speaking to the Huffington Post, he said: "I've got my phone book full of names and telephone numbers of people who want to make lots of money, and I call them when I need people. Sometimes I take English people, but not very often."

MPs from UKIPs opposition parties have spoken out against the irony of a situation where a political party who repeatedly warns of the danger of European immigrants taking British jobs employing those very people they warn against.

Gavin Barwell the MP for Croydon Central, an area in which Fast Leaflet operates, said that you “couldn’t make it up” and that UKIP’s "hypocrisy had no bounds."

This is just another one in a long list of controversies that have surrounded the UKIP party in recent times.

The party came under fire last month when it was found that a poster which was intended to depict an out of work builder was in fact an Irish actor Dave O’Rourke who had recently starred in a film.

Just two weeks ago, Nigel Farage received a lot of criticism when he said that no one apart from his German wife could cope with the “long-hours” and “low pay.”