Algeria crisis 'remains ongoing' after British hostages killed in Saharan bloodbath

Government dismay after Algerian forces attack Islamists at BP gas plant

Thirty hostages, including two Britons, were reported killed when Algerian forces defied international pleas for caution and stormed a BP gas field in the Sahara.

And today the UK Foreign Office said the crisis "remains ongoing".

David Cameron told MPs today that the Algerian government had not warned him it was planning to take military action .

He that the number of British citizens at risk in the terror attack has now been "quite significantly reduced" after reports last night that around 30 British citizens were believed to be "at risk".

Speaking in Australia today, Mr Hague told Sky News: "This remains a fluid and evolving situation and many details are still unclear, but the responsibility for the tragic events of the last two days squarely rests with terrorists who chose to attack innocent workers, murdering some and holding others hostage.

"Our priority remains at the moment to identify exactly what has happened to each British national caught up in this incident and, indeed, to help other countries determine what has happened to their nationals."

A US plane landed today at an airport near the desert gas plant to evacuate Americans caught up in the crisis, a local source told Reuters.

Eleven or more Islamist militants were said to have died when Algerian special forces, helicopters and – according to one account – warplanes launched a series of attacks on the sprawling complex seized by an Islamist group linked to al-Qa'ida on Wednesday. Twenty Britons remained unaccounted for, British sources said.

David Cameron said earlier that Britain “should be prepared for the possibility of further… very difficult news” following the death of a British oil worker in the initial Islamist attack. He postponed a speech he was due to give in Amsterdam today on Britain's future in Europe, saying he “simply cannot be away” until the crisis is resolved.

For most of the day utter confusion surrounded the Algerian military operation. Tonight there were reports that some of the raiders were still defying the Algerian forces inside the gas extraction plant. There were fears that the death toll might rise. An unknown number of foreign captives and 600 Algerians were reported to have been freed or to have escaped from their captors during the assault. Algerian security sources said tonight that 30 hostages had died in the battle, including eight Algerians, two Britons, two Japanese and one Frenchman. Algerian state television said earlier that two Britons and two Filipinos were among the dead.

Stephen McFaul, 36, from Belfast, was one of the lucky ones who got out. Tonight he telephoned his family to say he was safe. One of the freed Algerian hostages told the French newspaper Le Monde tonight that the Islamist raiders were a multinational group from a number of countries – including a man who spoke English with a perfect British accent. One of the dead militants was said to be a French national.

The Algerian Communications Minister, Mohamed Said Belaid, claimed the operation was a success. “A large number of hostages were freed and a large number of terrorists were eliminated and we regret the few dead and wounded,” he said.

According to one report, seven hostages were held for many hours after the main assault by a die-hard group of militants who resisted in part of the gas plant near the town of In Amenas, near the Libyan border. Radio France Internationale reported from Algiers that the raiders had made four attempts to flee this morning. A convoy of buses and trucks was finally attacked from the air by the Algerian military. The Algerians had told the raiders that they could leave the country without their hostages but the kidnappers had attempted to take some foreigners with them. The conclusion to the siege has strained relations between Britain and Algeria, with Mr Cameron admitting he only learnt the intervention was under way when he rang his opposite number, Abdelmalek Sellal, at 11.30am. He had stressed Britain wanted to be warned before any military operation. Mr Sellal said events were changing so quickly that his forces had been forced to act.

The Algerian assault came as French operations against Islamist rebels in neighbouring Mali entered a seventh day, with warplanes and helicopters continuing to pound targets in the centre and north of the country. Despite pledges of support from a number of European nations at a meeting of EU foreign ministers, none is sending troops. A French captive contacted by the newspaper Sud Ouest said the raiders had strapped explosives to some hostages. It appeared that the 20 or 30-strong gang of kidnappers had difficulty in controlling so many captives. There were reports during the day of small groups of Algerian and foreign workers escaping.

The unnamed Algerian captive who spoke to Le Monde tonight said that the raiders “seemed to know the site well and knew exactly what they were looking for.… They searched the living quarters for foreigners and told muslims that they were in no danger.”

The capture of the Algerian gas site was claimed by the Islamist splinter group, Mouwaghina Bi Dam (“Those Who Sign in Blood”) as a retaliation for French intervention in Mali. But Western governments suggested that the operation must have been planned for many weeks. The French President François Hollande said the hostage-taking in Algeria had proved France's argument that its armed intervention in Mali was about far more than the fate of the Malian government.

The raid on the BP complex is believed to have been inspired – and possibly led – by a veteran al-Qa'ida leader in North Africa, Mokhtar Belmokhtar. It was unclear tonight whether he was amongst the dead.

Western governments are believed to have urged the Algerian authorities – in vain – to take a softly-softly approach. Algiers has a reputation for taking a violent line with hostage-taking.

'Just like the riots in Belfast'

Stephen McFaul, the Belfast man who escaped from the hostage-takers, was laughing and joking as gunmen took over the plant, his family said tonight.

Stephen stayed in contact by mobile phone with his brother Brian, who said he could hear gunfire in the background. "It's like riots in west Belfast," said Stephen, who was discovered by terrorists hiding under a bed.

"When news came through that Stevie was free I told mum and dad and they hugged each other, shouting at the top of their voices," said Brian.

Sport
Thiago Silva pulls Arjen Robben back to concede a penalty
world cup 2014Brazil 0 Netherlands 3: More misery for hosts as Dutch take third place
Sport
Robin van Persie hands his third-place medal to a supporter
Van Persie gives bronze medal to eccentric fan moments after being handed it by Blatter
News
Ian Thorpe had Rio 2016 in his sights
people
Life and Style
Swimsuit, £245, by Agent Provocateur
fashion

Diving in at the deep end is no excuse for shirking the style stakes

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
News
scienceScientists have developed a material so dark you can't see it...
News
Monkey business: Serkis is the king of the non-human character performance
peopleFirst Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
Arts and Entertainment
Blackman: Landscape of children’s literature does not reflect the cultural diversity of young people
booksMalorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Voices
Mrs Brown's Boy: D'Movie has been a huge commercial success
voicesWhen it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor
Arts and Entertainment
Curtain calls: Madani Younis
theatreMadani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Life and Style
Douglas McMaster says the food industry is ‘traumatised’
food + drinkSilo in Brighton will have just six staple dishes on the menu every day, including one meat option, one fish, one vegan, and one 'wild card'
Life and Style
Once a month, waistline watcher Suran steps into a 3D body scanner that maps his body shape and records measurements with pinpoint accuracy
techFrom heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Sport
Mario Balotelli, Divock Origi, Loic Remy, Wilfried Bony and Karim Benzema
transfersBony, Benzema and the other transfer targets
News
Soft power: Matthew Barzun
peopleThe US Ambassador to London, Matthew Barzun, holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence. He says it's all part of the job
Sport
Joe Root and James Anderson celebrate their record-beaking partnership
cricketEngland's last-wicket stand against India rewrites the history books
News
Gavin Maxwell in Sandaig with one of his pet otters
peopleWas the otter man the wildlife champion he appeared to be?
News
Rowsell says: 'Wearing wigs is a way of looking normal. I pick a style and colour and stick to it because I don't want to keep wearing different styles'
peopleThe World Champion cyclist Joanna Rowsell on breaking her collarbone, shattering her teeth - and dealing with alopecia
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Information Security Manager (ISO 27001, Accreditation, ITIL)

£70000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Information Security Manager (ISO 27001, A...

C# Developer (HTML5, JavaScript, ASP.NET, Mathematics, Entity)

£30000 - £45000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: C# Developer (...

C# Integration Developer (.NET, Tibco EMS, SQL 2008/2012, XML)

£60000 - £80000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: C# Integration...

Biztalk - outstanding opportunity

£75000 - £85000 per annum + ex bens: Deerfoot IT Resources Limited: Biztalk Te...

Day In a Page

Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

The evolution of Andy Serkis

First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Children's books are too white, says Laureate

Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

Blackest is the new black

Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor
Gavin Maxwell's bitter legacy: Was the otter man the wildlife champion he appeared to be?

Otter man Gavin Maxwell's bitter legacy

The aristocrat's eccentric devotion to his pets inspired a generation. But our greatest living nature writer believes his legacy has been quite toxic
Joanna Rowsell: The World Champion cyclist on breaking her collarbone, shattering her teeth - and dealing with alopecia

Joanna Rowsell: 'I wear my wig to look normal'

The World Champion cyclist on breaking her collarbone, shattering her teeth - and dealing with alopecia
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef gives raw ingredients a lift with his quick marinades

Bill Granger's quick and delicious marinades

Our chef's marinades are great for weekend barbecuing, but are also a delicious way of injecting flavour into, and breaking the monotony of, weekday meals
Germany vs Argentina World Cup 2014 preview: Why Brazilians don't love their neighbours Argentina any more

Anyone but Argentina – why Brazilians don’t love their neighbours any more

The hosts will be supporting Germany in today's World Cup final, reports Alex Bellos
The Open 2014: Time again to ask that major question - can Lee Westwood win at last?

The Open 2014

Time again to ask that major question - can Lee Westwood win at last?