India produces £30 village computer

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The Independent Online

India unveiled a cheap tablet computer today, saying it would deliver modern technology to the countryside and help lift villagers out of poverty.







The computer, called Aakash, or "sky" in Hindi, is the latest in a series of "world's cheapest" innovations in India.



Developer Datawind is selling the tablets to the government for about 45 dollars (£30) each, and subsidies will reduce that to 35 dollars (£22) for students and teachers.



Datawind says it can make about 100,000 units a month at the moment, not nearly enough to meet India's hope of getting its 220 million children online.



Human Resources Development Minister Kapil Sibal called the announcement a message to all children of the world.



"This is not just for us. This is for all of you who are disempowered," he said. "This is for all those who live on the fringes of society."



Despite a burgeoning tech industry and decades of robust economic growth, there are still hundreds of thousands of Indians with no electricity, let alone access to computers and information that could help farmers improve yields, business start-ups reach clients, or students qualify for university.



The launch - attended by hundreds of students, some selected to help train others across the country in the tablet's use - followed five years of efforts to design a £6 computer that could bridge the country's vast digital divide.



"People laughed, people called us lunatics," ministry official N.K. Sinha said. "They said we are taking the nation for a ride."



Although the goal was not achieved, the Aakash has a colour screen and provides word processing, web browsing and video conferencing. The Android 2.2-based device has two USB ports and 256 megabytes of RAM. Despite hopes for a solar-powered version - important for India's energy-starved hinterlands - no such option is currently available.

AP

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