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Middle East

Corrupt Jordanian spy boss jailed for 13 years

Jordan's former spy chief, once one of the country's most feared and powerful officials, was sentenced to 13 years in prison yesterday in the first high-profile case from an anti-corruption crackdown driven by popular protests.

Retired General Mohammad al-Dahabi, who ran the country's intelligence agency from 2005 to 2009, was found guilty of money laundering, embezzlement and abuse of power, and was ordered to return $30m(£19.2m).

It was the first time a member of the political elite had been tried and jailed in a country where accusations of corruption are widespread and the security service wields huge power.

Dahabi's arrest last February and his trial which began in Amman a few months later were the most dramatic steps in an anti-graft campaign heralded as the largest ever in Jordan. Launched by King Abdullah last year, it was seen as a response to Arab Spring-inspired demonstrations calling for greater political freedoms and an end to corruption.

Dahabi's civilian trial broke new ground in Jordan, where most graft trials have been held in military or special courts that bypass the judiciary and are criticised as unconstitutional by rights activists.

Although many ministers have been called for questioning and scores of businessmen have been detained or investigated, few cases have gone to civilian court and convictions have been rare. Dahabi denied the charges. His supporters have said he is a political scapegoat.