England’s domination of Australia continues

Australia 245 all out v England 551-4 (Second Test, Adelaide, third day)

England’s utter domination of Australia continued unabated in Adelaide. For the fifth consecutive day of the Ashes series, the tourists ran their opponents ragged and this time it was Kevin Pietersen who led the mauling.





With his first Test century in 28 innings – which he converted into his second double – Pietersen ensured that Australia spent another long, unrewarding day in the field. There have been times in the past year when it seemed the old Pietersen might never re-emerge but he illuminated the Adelaide Oval with an innings of verve, imagination, skill and supreme confidence.



The first hundred came early on the third day in 158 balls, the second took only 125 balls and after he had sprinted the sharp single which raised it he sank to his knees before the rapturous England fans. When rain brought a premature end to the day, England were 551 for three, which meant that from the beginning of their second innings in the First Test in Brisbane, the tourists had scored 1068 for five in 267 overs.



Their partnerships in this match, replying to Australia’s first innings 245, have been 3, 173, 175, 101 and an unbeaten 99. Only once before at The Oval in 1938, also against Australia, has an England innings contained four partnerships of 100 or more.



It was Pietersen’s day from start to early finish. Alastair Cook added only 12 to his overnight 136 before he got an inside edge to a ball from Ryan Harris that cut in. Paul Collingwood, circumspect initially, provided the perfect foil to Pietersen before being lbw on the back foot and then Ian Bell once more fashioned an innings of elegance and beauty.



Australia’s bowlers wilted under the withering assault – England scored in 26 overs of the first session and 102 in 28 of the second – and three of them brought up hundreds of their own in the runs column of their analysis.



Pietersen has had a troubling time since losing the captaincy in acrimonious circumstances in early 2009. An achilles injury forced him to most of that summer’s Ashes series and complications in the recovery were followed by an long struggle to rediscover his form.

Suggested Topics
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy
Number of young homeless in Britain 'more than three times the official figures'

'Everything changed when I went to the hostel'

Number of young homeless people in Britain is 'more than three times the official figures'
Compton Cricket Club

Compton Cricket Club

Portraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb to be displayed in London
London now the global money-laundering centre for the drug trade, says crime expert

Wlecome to London, drug money-laundering centre for the world

'Mexico is its heart and London is its head'
The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court that helps a winner keep on winning

The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court

It helps a winner keep on winning
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate
Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Africa on the menu: Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the continent

Africa on the menu

Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the hot new continent
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'