Pakistan captain Butt had £40,000 including marked notes at hotel

Large sums also found in the rooms of Asif and Amir during police search after tip-off from journalist

Detectives uncovered around £40,000 in cash in eight different denominations as well as four mobile telephones when they searched the London hotel room of Salman Butt, then captain of Pakistan, on the evening of the third day of the fourth Test against England last year.

Among the cash was 50 marked £50 notes given by a News of the World journalist to Mazher Majeed, Butt's agent, on the eve of the Lord's Test in return for allegedly arranging with Butt and his team-mates Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Amir to spot-fix – bowl deliberate no-balls at agreed moments – during the match.

As part of the prosecution's case, the jury at Butt and Asif's trial were yesterday shown dramatic footage filmed by a hidden camera of the moment Majeed took delivery of £140,000 in £50 notes, all of which had had their serial numbers recorded, in another hotel room in a different part of London. Butt and Asif are charged with conspiracy to obtain and accept corrupt payments and conspiracy to cheat, which carry maximum sentences of seven and two years' imprisonment respectively. Both deny the charges.

Police searched the hotel rooms of the three players, the captain and his opening bowlers, after receiving information from the News of the World journalist Mazhar Mahmood – the paper published the story the following morning, 29 August.

In Butt's room, room 714 of the Marriott Hotel near Regent's Park, they discovered a large amount of cash inside an attaché case locked inside a suitcase that Butt said belonged to his wife. The police found £14,003 – among which were the marked notes – $12,617 and a further £15,999 in various denominations, including Canadian and Australian dollars, South African rand and UAE dhirams.

In Asif's room there was £8,000 in cash in eight envelopes split between two rucksacks and in Amir's room more than £9,000 in cash in a safe, including 30 of the News of the World £50 notes. All three players claimed the cash can in part be explained by the £114 daily allowance they receive while on tour to England. Butt told police much of the rest of the money was for his sisters to buy clothes for their forthcoming weddings and also part of a cash payment he had received from Majeed in return for agreeing to open an ice-cream parlour in Tooting after the Test. Asif said his cash was also for wedding shopping.

Two days before the police arrived at the Marriot, Majeed and Mahmood had met in the Copthorne Tara hotel in Kensington. Ahead of the meeting, which began at 10.50pm, Majeed phoned Amir, Butt and Asif. Operation Seawell, as the police investigation is named, has recovered a number of key texts and also relies on extensive phone records.

At the meeting it is claimed Majeed laid out the deal. Amir would bowl a no-ball with his first ball of the third over, Asif the last ball of the 10th over and Amir would deliver one more later, the last ball of the first over that he switched to round the wicket – his usual line of attack to a right-hander. England's openers, Alastair Cook and Andrew Strauss, are both left-handed, Jonathan Trott at No 3 is right-handed.

Butt and Asif watched from the dock as the jury were shown Majeed and Mahmood sitting on a sofa and an armchair at a low table. Mahmood handed out bundles of £50 notes and Majeed stacked them in front of him. "You're going to make a lot of money, believe me," said Majeed. The film also showed Majeed calling Amir, who was woken by the call. After he left the hotel, now approaching 11.30pm the night before the Test, Majeed called the other two, Butt and Asif, and then called Amir again and left a message.

Footage of the following day, the first of the fourth Test, was also shown to the court. First Amir does as promised in the third over and Billy Bowden calls no-ball, then Tony Hill, the other umpire and another New Zealander, called Asif on the last scheduled ball of the 10th. Amir's foot was a distance over the popping crease, Asif's a fraction.

Poor weather cut short the day and within minutes of the close, Butt, Asif and Amir were in contact with Majeed. By 10pm, the prosecution claim, a new deal was done for the following day. Majeed sent a text meant for Amir – "Yaar [mate], after you finish your current over, then three overs. Text back." In error he sent it to Mahmood.

The next day Amir underlined his enormous potential as a fast bowler by running through England's top order. Then came the arranged over and before its start Butt approached Amir and they spoke briefly. Amir overstepped again by a large margin.

Aftab Jafferjee, QC, outlining the Crown's case, said: "It is as if the sport is simply there as a vehicle with which money is to be made by 'fixing' certain aspects of the game; and it reveals the determination by the likes of Salman Butt to see it through."

Yesterday's proceedings also saw the Crown claim that the practice of spot-fixing attempted by Majeed goes beyond this one game. Majeed had tried to deliver a maiden over for Mahmood in the previous Test at The Oval through Butt, who was to play out the first full over he faced and signal his intent to do so by patting the pitch with his bat after the second ball – to demonstrate to the journalist that Butt was "onside". But a wicket fell early and Butt had to face the new ball; against a hard ball and a close field, the Pakistan captain could not control events as requested.

The police have obtained deleted text messages between Butt and Majeed from May when Pakistan were playing in the World Twenty20 in West Indies that suggest something was being arranged there. They also have one from March, during the Indian Premier League, between Majeed and his brother, Azhar, who had previously been Asif's agent. Azhar Majeed texted: "Let's do it, let's get hold of fucking cricket and squeeze everything we can from it."

In a meeting at Majeed's house in Croydon before the Oval Test, on 21 August, the agent suggested to Mahmood that he was "grooming" players to carry out his wishes. As well as Butt, Asif and Amir, he mentioned Kamran and Umar Akmal, Wahab Riaz and, to a lesser extent, Imran Farhat, as "his boys." "These boys are going to be around for years and I've got the best boys," said Majeed.

Of Amir, then 18 and already the youngest bowler to take 50 Test wickets, Mr Jafferjee suggested that it was a "tragedy that a young, amazing talent got seduced into corruption".

The case continues.

How much Salman Butt earns...

Salary from his club – National Bank of Pakistan: £420

From Pakistan Cricket Board: £2,000 per month, £2,600 per Test, £2,000 per T20

From sponsor: £800 for every international appearance, £500 per century, £250 per half-century

Two other contracts w/ sponsors worth total: £46,000

Total earned p.a (approx): £149,920

Compared to, for example... Andrew Strauss

Band A Central Contract: £400,000

Bonus: Appearances and wins, all pooled together by PCA then divvied out: £150,000

Sponsorships (bat, Jaguar, watches, etc): £500,000

Total earned p.a (approx): £1.05m

Arts and Entertainment
books
Voices
Caustic she may be, but Joan Rivers is a feminist hero, whether she likes it or not
voicesShe's an inspiration, whether she likes it or not, says Ellen E Jones
Arts and Entertainment
The Doctor and the Dalek meet
tvReview: Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Sport
Diego Costa
footballEverton 3 Chelsea 6: Diego Costa double has manager purring
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Life and Style
3D printed bump keys can access almost any lock
techSoftware needs photo of lock and not much more
Arts and Entertainment
The 'three chords and the truth gal' performing at the Cornbury Music Festival, Oxford, earlier this summer
music... so how did she become country music's hottest new star?
Life and Style
The spy mistress-general: A lecturer in nutritional therapy in her modern life, Heather Rosa favours a Byzantine look topped off with a squid and a schooner
fashionEurope's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln
News
Dr Alice Roberts in front of a
peopleAlice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Star turns: Montacute House
tv
News
i100Steve Carell selling chicken, Tina Fey selling saving accounts and Steve Colbert selling, um...
Arts and Entertainment
Unsettling perspective: Iraq gave Turner a subject and a voice (stock photo)
booksBrian Turner's new book goes back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
News
The Digicub app, for young fans
advertisingNSPCC 'extremely concerned'
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Some of the key words and phrases to remember
booksA user's guide to weasel words
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor
She's dark, sarcastic, and bashes life in Nowheresville ... so how did Kacey Musgraves become country music's hottest new star?

Kacey Musgraves: Nashville's hottest new star

The singer has two Grammys for her first album under her belt and her celebrity fans include Willie Nelson, Ryan Adams and Katy Perry
American soldier-poet Brian Turner reveals the enduring turmoil that inspired his memoir

Soldier-poet Brian Turner on his new memoir

James Kidd meets the prize-winning writer, whose new memoir takes him back to the bloody battles he fought in Iraq
Aston Villa vs Hull match preview: Villa were not surprised that Ron Vlaar was a World Cup star

Villa were not surprised that Vlaar was a World Cup star

Andi Weimann reveals just how good his Dutch teammate really is
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef ekes out his holiday in Italy with divine, simple salads

Bill Granger's simple Italian salads

Our chef presents his own version of Italian dishes, taking in the flavours and produce that inspired him while he was in the country
The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

The Last Word: Tumbleweed through deserted stands and suites at Wembley

If supporters begin to close bank accounts, switch broadband suppliers or shun satellite sales, their voices will be heard. It’s time for revolution