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Jack Warner 'accepted payments of almost $2m from Qatari firm linked to World Cup bid'


The former vice president of Fifa is facing new allegations that he accepted payments of almost $2 million (£1.2m) from a Qatari firm linked to the country’s successful bid for the 2022 World Cup.

It was reported that payments totalling almost $750,000 (£450,000) have been made to Jack Warner’s sons, and a further $400,000 (£240,000) to one of his employees.

Mr Warner stood down from his role with Fifa in 2011 after being accused of paying bribes to Caribbean associations.

The FBI are understood to be investigating the latest allegations, which have reignited controversy over the awarding of the 2022 World Cup to Qatar, a decision that was shrouded in controversy. Qatar has repeatedly denied wrongdoing during the bidding process though several members of the Fifa committee have faced corruption allegations.

Until he stood down, Mr Warner was the longest serving member of Fifa's executive committee. He previously held senior position in government and before that had dominated Caribbean football for more than three decades.

Yesterday Mr Warner and his family declined to comment on the claims reported in the the Daily Telegraph.

This latest disclosure is further embarrassment for Qatar, which has faced allegations of human rights breaches in preparation for the tournament in 2022. Campaigners say that more than 40 Nepalese labourers have died as a result of poor working conditions while working on World Cup sites in the country's capital city, Doha, while a damning report published last November claimed thousands of migrants were trapped inside labour camps having been “deceived” into joining the country’s construction frenzy ahead of the competition.

A spokesman for Qatar’s 2022 World Cup organising committee told The Telegraph: “The 2022 bid committee strictly adhered to Fifa’s bidding regulations in compliance with their code of ethics.

“The supreme committee for delivery and legacy and the individuals involved in the 2022 bid committee are unaware of any allegations surrounding business dealings between private individuals.”