2014 World Cup hosts unveil caxirolas - a new infuriating instrument to rival the vuvuzela

If you thought vuvuzelas were bad, wait until you hear 80,000 Brazilians shaking their caxirolas

Thought you’d heard the last of monotonous drones blasting out from the terraces? Think again.

Following the international sensation of questionable musical value that was the vuvuzela – the multi-coloured two-foot long plastic horn that became such a hit with football fans at the 2010 World Cup in South Africa that they were subsequently banned – the caxirola has been unveiled as the aural stimulant of choice at next year’s tournament in Brazil.

This time the instrument, which has been created in a collaboration between the Brazilian musician Carlinhos Brown and the country’s ministry of sports, has been carefully designed to sound considerably less grating.

Unlike the vuvuzela, which has historical cultural significance in South Africa, the caxirola has been designed especially for use in stadiums.

A yellow and green percussion instrument which makes a rattling sound when shaken, it makes a sound not dissimilar to the traditional South American “rainstick”.

Made from recycled plastic, the noisy implement will be handed to fans attending the Confederations Cup in June, the country’s unofficial dress rehearsal for the 2014 World Cup. The President of Brazil, Dilma Rousseff, said: “It is an object that has the ability to do two things: to combine the image with sound and take us to our goals.”

A FIFA spokesman promised the instrument would “add to the fan experience” at the tournaments and help “create a unique Brazilian atmosphere in the stadiums”.

News of the vuvuzela replacment may come as a relief to armchair football fans around the world following complaints that the South African instruments drowned out television commentary during some games in the 2010 tournament.

Measurements put the sound of the vuvuzela at 127 decibels, just short of the sound level generated by a jet taking off from an aircraft carrier at a distance of 50ft.

Portugal and Real Madrid star Cristiano Ronaldo said the noise from the instruments had affected the concentration of his teammates while the captain of the French side, Patrice Evra, blamed a goalless draw with Uruguay on a vuvuzela cacophony.

Despite calls for an immediate ban on the instruments during the tournament, the South African authorities steadfastly refused the demands insisting that it was “ingrained in our history”. A World Cup spokesman said at the time: “Only a minority are against vuvuzelas. You either love them or hate them. We in South Africa love them.”

The instruments were subsequently banned by UEFA and Fifa, but nonetheless won some fans among those participating in the 2010 games. The England defender Jamie Carragher said the sound had not bothered him while playing and he had already bought two of the instruments for his young children.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

In a world of Saudi bullying, right-wing Israeli ministers and the twilight of Obama, Iran is looking like a possible policeman of the Gulf

Iran is shifting from pariah to possible future policeman of the Gulf

Robert Fisk on our crisis with Iran
The young are the new poor: A third of young people pushed into poverty

The young are the new poor

Sharp increase in the number of under-25s living in poverty
Greens on the march: ‘We could be on the edge of something very big’

Greens on the march

‘We could be on the edge of something very big’
Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby - through the stories of his accusers

Revealed: the case against Bill Cosby

Through the stories of his accusers
Why are words like 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?

The Meaning of Mongol

Why are the words 'mongol' and 'mongoloid' still bandied about as insults?
Mau Mau uprising: Kenyans still waiting for justice join class action over Britain's role in the emergency

Kenyans still waiting for justice over Mau Mau uprising

Thousands join class action over Britain's role in the emergency
Isis in Iraq: The trauma of the last six months has overwhelmed the remaining Christians in the country

The last Christians in Iraq

After 2,000 years, a community will try anything – including pretending to convert to Islam – to avoid losing everything, says Patrick Cockburn
Black Friday: Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Helpful discounts for Christmas shoppers, or cynical marketing by desperate retailers?

Britain braced for Black Friday
Bill Cosby's persona goes from America's dad to date-rape drugs

From America's dad to date-rape drugs

Stories of Bill Cosby's alleged sexual assaults may have circulated widely in Hollywood, but they came as a shock to fans, says Rupert Cornwell
Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

Clare Balding: 'Women's sport is kicking off at last'

As fans flock to see England women's Wembley debut against Germany, the TV presenter on an exciting 'sea change'
Oh come, all ye multi-faithful: The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?

Oh come, all ye multi-faithful

The Christmas jumper is in fashion, but should you wear your religion on your sleeve?
Dr Charles Heatley: The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

The GP off to do battle in the war against Ebola

Dr Charles Heatley on joining the NHS volunteers' team bound for Sierra Leone
Flogging vlogging: First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books

Flogging vlogging

First video bloggers conquered YouTube. Now they want us to buy their books
Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show: US channels wage comedy star wars

Saturday Night Live vs The Daily Show

US channels wage comedy star wars
When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine? When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible

When is a wine made in Piedmont not a Piemonte wine?

When EU rules make Italian vineyards invisible