'Barmy', 'laughable', 'disbelieving': The reaction to Sepp Blatter comments

 

Wolves boss Mick McCarthy today branded FIFA president Sepp Blatter's comments on racism as "barmy" and called for him to resign.

Blatter suggested that racist abuse between players should be settled by a handshake - and McCarthy said the FIFA president's remarks were so appalling he should step down.

McCarthy said: "They are outrageous comments from Blatter. I would expect better from a man heading that organisation, that's for sure.

"It is doubtful whether he can remain. I say doubtful but he runs the place. He has got to resign if he is going to go.

"Whether he has got that about him, I don't know. He shouldn't have said it.

"I think he should go personally. His comments were barmy and at best misguided."

Birmingham defender Curtis Davies labelled Blatter's remarks as laughable.

He said: "If someone calls you this and that due to your race, you know they've dug deep to say that to you.

"It's just laughable really to think that you could shrug off being called whatever with a handshake."

Tottenham assistant manager Joe Jordan said that racial abuse crossed the line of what should be left on the pitch.

"You have to accept there is banter on a football pitch," said Jordan.

"But there are lines that are banter and there are lines where you have to say 'you can't say that', and when that happens it can't be forgotten at the end of a game."

Lord Herman Ouseley, chair of football's equality group Kick It Out, was left stunned by the comments made by Blatter in two television interviews.

Ouseley said: "To say Sepp Blatter's comments are unhelpful is an understatement. They're disbelieving.

"He has no understanding of what racism is, the ideology behind it, the damage it causes and how it subjugates one group of people as inferior.

"Enlightened leadership at this level is needed. Minor matters on the field often can be resolved with a handshake. Racism is not a minor matter.

"Kick It Out has no truck with the notion that racism can be dismissed and trivialised in this way."

Preston defender Clarke Carlisle, the PFA chairman and a Kick It Out ambassador, warned that Blatter's comments run the risk of undermining years of work aimed at eradicating racism from the game.

"We've come through some 20 or 30 years of campaigning to bring racism to the height of awareness that it is at the moment," he told BBC Radio 5 Live.

"To come so far on such a sensitive topic, [yet] in one fell swoop he can almost give carte blanche that racism is acceptable between the hours of 3pm and 4.45pm on a Saturday."

The 20 Premier League clubs released a statement on the issue following a meeting of club chairmen today.

The statement said: "The English game has been at the forefront of tackling racist behaviour and other forms of discrimination.

"Everybody in the game in England understands any form of racism is totally unacceptable.

"There are still issues, as there are in society, so with our partners, Kick It Out, the PFA and the FA, we must remain committed and vigilant to maintaining the standards we have set and confronting any incidents that occur."

Stoke boss Tony Pulis was another manager amazed by what Blatter had come out with.

Pulis said: "I think one thing it proves is that he is miles away from what is actually happening in football and in the world. I'm amazed that he has come out with the comments, but the big question is who is actually going to take him to task."

Former Sheffield Wednesday and Crystal Palace striker Mark Bright warned that the effects of the comments could be felt throughout football.

Bright said: "This is what Blatter is saying: at Hackney Marshes on Sunday morning you can say whatever you want to your opponent, whatever race, creed or colour he is, and at the end of the game when you shake hands it should be all forgotten - go to the bar and have a drink. Those days are over. It's an old-fashioned view, it's archaic, it's illegal."

PA

Arts and Entertainment
filmPoldark production team claims innocence of viewers' ab frenzy
Life and Style
Google marks the 81st anniversary of the Loch Ness Monster's most famous photograph
techIt's the 81st anniversary of THAT iconic photograph
News
Katie Hopkins makes a living out of courting controversy
people
News
General Election
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

Revealed: Why Mohammed Emwazi chose the 'safe option' of fighting for Isis, rather than following his friends to al-Shabaab in Somalia

Why Mohammed Emwazi chose Isis

His friends were betrayed and killed by al-Shabaab
'The solution can never be to impassively watch on while desperate people drown'
An open letter to David Cameron: Building fortress Europe has had deadly results

Open letter to David Cameron

Building the walls of fortress Europe has had deadly results
Tory candidates' tweets not as 'spontaneous' as they seem - you don't say!

You don't say!

Tory candidates' election tweets not as 'spontaneous' as they appear
Mubi: Netflix for people who want to stop just watching trash

So what is Mubi?

Netflix for people who want to stop just watching trash all the time
The impossible job: how to follow Kevin Spacey?

The hardest job in theatre?

How to follow Kevin Spacey
Armenian genocide: To continue to deny the truth of this mass human cruelty is close to a criminal lie

Armenian genocide and the 'good Turks'

To continue to deny the truth of this mass human cruelty is close to a criminal lie
Lou Reed: The truth about the singer's upbringing beyond the biographers' and memoirists' myths

'Lou needed care, but what he got was ECT'

The truth about the singer's upbringing beyond
Migrant boat disaster: This human tragedy has been brewing for four years and EU states can't say they were not warned

This human tragedy has been brewing for years

EU states can't say they were not warned
Women's sportswear: From tackling a marathon to a jog in the park, the right kit can help

Women's sportswear

From tackling a marathon to a jog in the park, the right kit can help
Hillary Clinton's outfits will be as important as her policies in her presidential bid

Clinton's clothes

Like it or not, her outfits will be as important as her policies
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders