Dave Whelan: Wigan chairman charged by FA for alleged racist comments

Whelan had insisted he had been misquoted

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The Independent Online

Wigan chairman Dave Whelan has been charged by the Football Association with an aggravated breach of its rules following his comments about Jewish and Chinese people, the FA has said.

A statement on the FA's website read: "It is alleged the Wigan Athletic chairman breached FA Rule E3[1] in that his comments were abusive and/or insulting and/or constitute improper conduct and/or bring the game into disrepute.

"It is further alleged that this is an ‘Aggravated Breach’ as defined by FA Rule E3[2] as it included a reference to ethnic origin and/or race and/or nationality and/or religion or belief. 

"Mr Whelan has until 6pm on 5 December 2014 to respond to the charge."

Whelan was accused of anti-Semitism and condoning racism for referring to Chinese people as "chinks" and saying Jewish people "chase money" in an interview he gave to the Guardian after hiring Malky Mackay as manager.

The Wigan owner later apologised during an interview with Sky Sports television but his comments were widely condemned.

Chinese community leader Jenny Wong told the Guardian that he was condoning racism while anti-discrimination group Kick It Out questioned whether he was "a fit and proper person who should be running a professional football club".

The Board of Deputies of British Jews also said the apology was not good enough.

"Whelan's bigoted and racist comments about Jews are outrageous and offensive and bring the club and the game in to disrepute," said board vice president Jonathan Arkush.

"His half-hearted apology does not go far enough. You cannot insult a whole group of people, and then say, 'I would never insult them', and hope that's OK."

The FA also said last week that a case against former Cardiff City manager Mackay and Iain Moody, the Welsh club's former head of recruitment, was continuing.

Texts between Mackay and Moody, some of which were sexist, racist and homophobic in nature, were made public in August.

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