Neil Warnock: My appetite is whetted by thought of taking over at a tasty top club

What I Learnt This Week

It's been an interesting week.

There are possibilities cropping up that may offer the chance to get back into the game and I have to admit they whet my appetite. There are good clubs looking for a manager – my old club Huddersfield, one of the top six clubs in England in Leeds, as well as Premier League Wolves. All top clubs and each offers a different opportunity for the right person. I'm not writing anything off regarding taking a job on until the end of the season.

I'm getting over the disappointment of QPR, although it remains difficult for me to understand and take – but life goes on and I still feel I did a fantastic job. The supporters and myself had a real roller-coaster ride, full of thrills really, so if I do take a job it's got to be at a club that gets me excited and gets the hairs on the back of my neck to stand up. That's the type of job that keeps me going and all three I have mentioned fit that bill.

It doesn't really bother me which division I manage in – I'm not one to say I have to manage in the Premier League. There are plenty of good clubs outside it. When I left Notts County many years ago I went to Torquay for 17 games. People thought I was mad. Torquay looked like they were going out of the Football League and all the advice I was getting from within the game was that it would be a blemish on my CV.

But I took it and I loved it. There were kids on £100 a week running through brick walls for me. It was a reality check. Many managers wouldn't entertain going down a division, but it doesn't bother me. Don't forget, either, that I left Huddersfield having got them promoted to take over at Plymouth, who were then in the bottom division. Looking back it was a fabulous decision, not least because that's when we bought a house in Cornwall and where our love for the area began to bloom.

2. The horrors of dealing with administration

With Portsmouth and Rangers going into administration it took me back to my time at Crystal Palace. We never saw it coming at Palace. It is difficult to deal with as a manager. You have to put a brave face on it. You are the front of house, as it were. You have to keep the players going, players who are worried about paying their mortgages and bills. Our money was delayed and the day before a match we would have players ringing their banks to see if they had been paid. That anxiety affects performance. You try and sort all the problems out, but it mounts up and when you have 20-odd players with issues it becomes overpowering.

My dealings with the administrators at Palace were diabolical. I didn't have a lot of time for the people who were in charge. All they wanted to do was sell players – they didn't seem to be looking to get the best value for money. It was short-term thinking.

They tried to get me to sell Nathaniel Clyne to Wolves and Victor Moses. They ended up selling Moses cheaply at £1.5m – they should have got at least £2.5m.

3. It's official. There is one referee who I like!

I know a lot of people won't be surprised to see Stuart Attwell has been demoted to the Football League. But Stuart has the makings of a top-class referee and I feel sorry that he was thrown in at the deep end. It only needed a couple of incidents for his age to be chucked at him time and time again. If those decisions had been made by an experienced referee they wouldn't have got as much coverage but things were magnified because the hierarchy put him on a pedestal. I'm glad now he can relax and concentrate on being a referee because he is a good referee.

4. Crabs and fish take my mind off the Wolves

There have been strange goings-on this week. Motorists letting me in at junctions and, when I was a pedestrian, people stopping to let me cross the road – then I remember I'm in Cornwall. It's a different world.

Last Saturday, when all the hustle and bustle of the football afternoon was going on, I was rock-pooling with William and Amy. It was the best haul we've had, crabs (look at the picture of this monster, left) and big fish, and they had a good laugh at my trousers too. I have lost lots of weight so there was plenty of room in them. The whole afternoon was entirely opposite to what I would normally be doing at that time on a Saturday.

5. United's golden oldies really are great shakes

I watched Manchester United against Liverpool last weekend. Like everyone else, I was disappointed in the whole handshake incident. I don't understand why we still have them. It doesn't help with the Respect campaign – they don't serve a purpose.

The game itself showed that United won't go away – it's going to be neck and neck with City right to the end. Is it any coincidence that now United are beginning to play well again, the old campaigners are back in the swing? It's like Ryan Giggs and Paul Scholes have never been away. I still get a buzz out of watching Giggs. What a great professional. I'm sure the young lads in the squad can only be inspired by him. It's don't do as I say, do as I do. Younger professionals can be easily distracted and at Man United their strength over the years has been having people like Gary Neville – he was as good as it gets as a professional – his brother Phil and David Beckham, as well as Giggs and Scholes, to set an example. I love the way Beckham, as much of a multimillionaire that he is, has handled himself. I'm a massive fan and I would like to see him in the Olympic team – he deserves it.

6. Giggs should start as manager lower down

I saw the suggestions that Ryan Giggs may be Sir Alex Ferguson's choice as United's next manager. It's an interesting idea but miles too early. I don't think you have any chance of managing a club like Manchester United straight off. When you have a name you have more opportunities to start at a big club but I feel you have to get experience, you have to have the disappointments and the bad runs and work out how to get over that. Long term, if you can manage lower down it does help you.

7. Tevez drama is just like Corrie – without the gags

That was a big win for Man City at Aston Villa. It was as good as they have been over the last few weeks. It was a tough game and they ground it out – a massive three points.

I suppose everyone now will be glued to the next instalment of the Carlos Tevez saga. It's like Coronation Street. Carlos says one thing, the manager another. For all parties the best thing will be the end of the season when he moves on. It will be interesting to see if he does make some sort of apology and whether Mancini will be able to use him when he has obviously upset the fans so much. You suspect it's beyond repair.

8. If Van Persie goes, you really fear for Arsenal

The biggest disappointment of the week has got to be Arsenal. It was the manner of how it happened. I can't remember seeing a more out-of-sorts Arsenal and in such a big game it's difficult to understand. Not one of the players came out with any credit. Arsène Wenger must be pulling his hair out. The biggest problem they are going to have after a performance like that is how are they going to keep hold of Robin van Persie? You have to fear for them if he leaves.

9. And while we're at it, Chelsea worry me too

Which leaves Chelsea as possibly the only ones left in the Champions League, but I worry about them too. They are a bit too predictable this year. They used to be so dynamic but now you have Daniel Sturridge playing wide and he is not a wide man. They don't get beyond teams so much so you don't get midfielders like Frank Lampard making runs into space because the opponents are not so stretched.

It's as difficult a job as there is in the Premier League for such a young manager. Will Roman Abramovich have the patience while Andre Villas-Boas changes his squad? There is a possibility that they are not going to get in the Champions League next season and that will be as big a test of the owner as the manager.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
Nick Clegg on the campaign trail in Glasgow on Wednesday; he says education is his top priority
peopleNick Clegg remains optimistic despite dismal Lib Dem poll ratings
Arts and Entertainment
Déjà vu: David Tennant returns to familiar territory with Anna Gunn (‘Breaking Bad’)
tvReview: Something is missing in Gracepoint, and it's not just the familiar names
Arts and Entertainment
Buttoned up: Ryan Reynolds with Helen Mirren in ‘Woman in Gold’
filmFor every box-office smash in his Hollywood career, there's always been a misconceived let-down. Now he says it's time for a reboot
News
people
News
Actress Julianne Moore wins the Best Actress in a Leading Role Award for 'Still Alice' during the 87th Annual Academy Awards in Hollywood, California
people
Sport
Ross Barkley
footballPaul Scholes says it's time for the Everton playmaker to step up and seize the England No 10 shirt
News
'We will fix it': mice in the 1970s children’s programme Bagpuss
science
Life and Style
2 Karl Lagerfeld and Choupette
fashion
Caption competition
Caption competition
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

Bleacher Report

Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Day In a Page

War with Isis: Iraq declares victory in the battle for Tikrit - but militants make make ominous advances in neighbouring Syria's capital

War with Isis

Iraq declares victory in the battle for Tikrit - but militants make make ominous advances in neighbouring Syria
Scientists develop mechanical spring-loaded leg brace to improve walking

A spring in your step?

Scientists develop mechanical leg brace to help take a load off
Peter Ackroyd on Alfred Hitchcock: How London shaped the director's art and obsessions

Peter Ackroyd on Alfred Hitchcock

Ackroyd has devoted his literary career to chronicling the capital and its characters. He tells John Walsh why he chose the master of suspense as his latest subject
Ryan Reynolds interview: The actor is branching out with Nazi art-theft drama Woman in Gold

Ryan Reynolds branches out in Woman in Gold

For every box-office smash in Ryan Reynolds' Hollywood career, there's always been a misconceived let-down. It's time for a rethink and a reboot, the actor tells James Mottram
Why Robin Williams safeguarded himself against a morbid trend in advertising

Stars safeguard against morbid advertising

As film-makers and advertisers make increasing posthumous use of celebrities' images, some stars are finding new ways of ensuring that they rest in peace
The UK horticulture industry is facing a skills crisis - but Great Dixter aims to change all that

UK horticulture industry facing skills crisis

Great Dixter manor house in East Sussex is encouraging people to work in the industry by offering three scholarships a year to students, as well as generous placements
Hack Circus aims to turn the rule-abiding approach of TED talks on its head

Hack Circus: Technology, art and learning

Hack Circus aims to turn the rule-abiding approach of TED talks on its head. Rhodri Marsden meets mistress of ceremonies Leila Johnston
Sevenoaks is split over much-delayed decision on controversial grammar school annexe

Sevenoaks split over grammar school annexe

If Weald of Kent Grammar School is given the go-ahead for an annexe in leafy Sevenoaks, it will be the first selective state school to open in 50 years
10 best compact cameras

A look through the lens: 10 best compact cameras

If your smartphone won’t quite cut it, it’s time to invest in a new portable gadget
Paul Scholes column: Ross Barkley played well against Italy but he must build on that. His time to step up and seize that England No 10 shirt is now

Paul Scholes column

Ross Barkley played well against Italy but he must build on that. His time to step up and seize that England No 10 shirt is now
Why Michael Carrick is still proving an enigma for England

Why Carrick is still proving an enigma for England

Manchester United's talented midfielder has played international football for almost 14 years yet, frustratingly, has won only 32 caps, says Sam Wallace
Tracey Neville: The netball coach who is just as busy as her brothers, Gary and Phil

Tracey Neville is just as busy as her brothers, Gary and Phil

The former player on how she is finding time to coach both Manchester Thunder in the Superleague and England in this year's World Cup
General Election 2015: The masterminds behind the scenes

The masterminds behind the election

How do you get your party leader to embrace a message and then stick to it? By employing these people
Machine Gun America: The amusement park where teenagers go to shoot a huge range of automatic weapons

Machine Gun America

The amusement park where teenagers go to shoot a huge range of automatic weapons
The ethics of pet food: Why are we are so selective in how we show animals our love?

The ethics of pet food

Why are we are so selective in how we show animals our love?