Tottenham supporter arrested for using the word 'Yid' is released on bail

The fan was arrested at half-time in the match between Spurs and West Ham

A Tottenham supporter arrested at half-time during Sunday's 3-0 defeat to West Ham for using the term “Yid” has been released on bail until November.

Both sets of fans travelling to the match at White Hart Lane had been warned by police that they could face arrest if they were heard chanting the word, which has been a recurring theme amongst Spurs supporters for some time.

Yid is a term for a Jewish person which is often considered derogatory, but fans of the north London club chant the word as an act of defiance against those who taunt them because of their links with the Jewish community.

Despite the police warning, home fans sang "Yid army" and "We'll sing what we want" before kick-off and the chants did not cease throughout the match. Police confirmed that a 51-year-old man was arrested after committing a section five public order offence at half-time in the stadium's East Stand and he will now appear in court later next month.

West Ham's fans were under intense scrutiny after last year's corresponding Barclays Premier League fixture was marred by a small section of the away support using anti-Semitic language and hissing loudly in an attempt to mimic the gassing of Jews during the Holocaust.

The Hammers' co-chairmen David Sullivan and David Gold, as well as manager Sam Allardyce, had pleaded with fans ahead of the game to avoid a repeat of such instances and, with no arrests linked to chanting made amongst their supporters, it appears the West Ham fans listened.

The Metropolitan Police on Monday confirmed that nine other arrests were made for other public order offences during and after the match, which the away team won courtesy of second-half goals from Winston Reid, Ricardo Vaz Te and Ravel Morrison.

Sullivan issued a statement on Monday afternoon praising the behaviour of West Ham's travelling contingent.

"It was a truly memorable afternoon for West Ham United at White Hart Lane on Sunday and I want to personally thank our fans for the important role they played in it," he said.

"While Sam Allardyce's tactics and the players will rightly be praised for an absolutely outstanding 3-0 win at our local rivals, our fans made sure that today's headlines were all about football rather than events in the stands.

"On Sunday morning, I wrote an open letter to supporters attending the game to remind them they would be acting as ambassadors for our club. As expected, they did not let us down."

Sullivan also acknowledged the role played by his fellow chairman Gold, who himself is Jewish, in preventing a repeat of the distasteful chants from last season.

"They [the fans] also showed respect for the occasion and understanding of the magnifying glass that was on them in the build-up to the game," he added.

"I would also like to save a few words of praise for my joint chairman David Gold for the emotive and highly personal interview he did ahead of the game. Discrimination is an issue that is close to our hearts, which is why we were clear beforehand that it has no place at West Ham United."

PA

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