Boxing: Klitschko mocks sad Haye after leaving him battered and broken

The calculated savagery continued on Saturday night long after Wladimir Klitschko's fists had distorted David Haye's face in the sodden ring when the pair sat down for the press conference.

Haye had lost nine of the 12 rounds in the ring but he lost every second of the press conference as first Klitschko, and then his trainer Manny Steward, slowly dissected his poor performance and his excuses. It was, in many ways, more painful to watch than the fight.

Haye insisted that a broken toe, which simply refused to heal, ruined his chances and meant that he was unable to get any leverage from the foot and therefore was unable to land correctly with this right hand. Klitschko looked over at Haye and laughed.

"A broken toe? Really? It looks like a bee bit you," he said as Haye lifted his right foot onto the table at the press conference. "If you keep talking you will end up like a sore loser. A fighter, David, must never say that he has a broken toe after a defeat. It sounds like sour grapes." Haye, it has to be said, looked more like a broken man at that point.

It was a strange fight from the start with thousands of empty seats left covered in their plastic sheath because of the torrential rain, which started as drizzle in the city twelve hours before the first bell. The fight was close to being pushed back an hour in the hope that the rain would finally stop. It never did.

Klitschko, who was defending his three heavyweight championship belts for the 10th time of his second reign, immediately took the fight to Haye, pushing him back and kept him on the back foot and swinging wildly out of range for two clear rounds. Haye failed to read the pulsating jab of his opponent from the first bell and never found a way to avoid it or counter with power. The fight's progress was a depressing ritual to watch as Haye's heavyweight limitations were exposed slowly round by round.

"We expected David to be more aggressive," Steward said. "The fight was much easier for Wladimir than we expected. David helped us by doing exactly what we wanted; he threw his right and missed and he threw two punches and fell off balance. That was an easy night for Wladimir." Haye, wearing shades just ten feet away, had to just sit through the criticism; it was a long way from the happy days of predicting a knock-out and wearing a t-shirt with a picture of him holding up Wladimir's severed head.

"David, tonight you are now in the place where you deserve to be," continued Wladimir, who translated his own answers and delivered each in English, German and Ukrainian. "I have to say now the truth; the t-shirt pissed me off, it was below the line, but I love you and hate you because it made me win."

The fight had slipped away by about round seven; a round in which the referee deducted a point from Klitschko for repeatedly pushing Haye to the canvas. Haye's lunges had failed, his jabs were blocked like a man wiping away a putrid smell and his face was starting to swell.

However, it has to be said that he never turned away from the full powered punches that Klitschko landed and from my privileged third-row seat it was possible to glimpse the white of his gumshield whenever he was caught flush. He was hurt often enough but he dug his toes into the white canvas, bit on the shield and threw something wild in Klitschko's direction. "I kept trying, I was not going to quit like so many of Wladimir's opponents have done," insisted Haye.

"After five or six rounds he couldn't do what I was asking of him," said Adam Booth, who has quite brilliantly guided Haye from cruiserweight titles to heavyweight world title and a fight of Saturday's importance, magnitude and cash. "That is the first time that he's not been able to respond to me in the corner. That's worrying, not an excuse, just a fact."

During the last few rounds Klitschko was forced on several occasions to hold when one of Haye's rights did connect. However, his easy lead behind the simple jab, his presence and his experience made the fight look like a mismatch at times. Haye was poor and, having known him for a long time, it is painfully clear that he is aware of the distance between his words and his punches.

"I will sit down and take a look at just how bad I was and then make some decisions,' admitted Haye, who had planned to retire by his 31st birthday on October 13th this year. "I don't want to finish on a loss." There is, however, a problem in cash expectations for his next fight compared to cash reality. Haye could make as much as £15m pounds from Saturday's fight and it is impossible to imagine an immediate fight that would generate 10 per cent of that total.

"I would love a rematch because I was not at my best but I don't think that will happen," continued Haye. A few people chuckled, but not Klitschko. "A rematch? Really? I never thought that I would hear those words from you. I hope your toe is better, but I would knock you out next time." All three judges scored heavily in Klitschko's favour.

Haye tried to defend himself but his microphone was off and the conference was at an end. He was trying, about two hours too late, to compliment Klitschko. "The toe is not an excuse. I lost to the better man," I heard Haye say. It was too little, much too late and Klitschko had disappeared behind a wall of celebratory German journalists. At that point, with the clock a minute or so before 3am, Booth steered his boxer away and into an uncertain future.

Suggested Topics
News
Emma Watson has become the latest target of the 4Chan nude hacking scandal
peopleThreats follows actress' speech on feminism and equality at the UN
Arts and Entertainment
British actor Idris Elba is also a DJ and rapper who played Ibiza last summer
film
Arts and Entertainment
Geena Davis, founder and chair of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media
tv
News
Alan Bennett criticised the lack of fairness in British society encapsulated by the private school system
peopleBut he does like Stewart Lee
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Sport
John Terry, Frank Lampard
footballChelsea captain sends signed shirt to fan whose mum had died
Life and Style
food + drink
Arts and Entertainment
Rita Ora will replace Kylie Minogue as a judge on The Voice 2015
tv
Life and Style
tech
Life and Style
Alan Turing, who was convicted of gross indecency in 1952, was granted a royal pardon last year
life
Arts and Entertainment
Sheridan Smith as Cilla Black and Ed Stoppard as her manager Brian Epstein
tvCilla Episode 2 review: Grit under the glamour in part two of biopic series starring Sheridan Smith
Life and Style
life
Arts and Entertainment
Tennis player Andy Murray's mum Judy has been paired with Anton du Beke for Strictly Come Dancing. 'I'm absolutely delighted,' she said.
tvJudy Murray 'struggling' to let Anton Du Beke take control on Strictly
Life and Style
Vote with your wallet: the app can help shoppers feel more informed about items on sale
lifeNew app reveals political leanings of food companies
Caption competition
Caption competition
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Primary teaching roles in Ipswich

£21552 - £31588 per annum: Randstad Education Cambridge: Randstad Education re...

Science teachers needed in Norwich

£21000 - £35000 per annum: Randstad Education Cambridge: Science teachers requ...

Semi Senior Accountant - Music

£30000 - £35000 per annum: Sauce Recruitment: A successful, Central London bas...

English teachers required in Lowestoft

£21000 - £35000 per annum: Randstad Education Cambridge: Qualified English tea...

Day In a Page

Secret politics of the weekly shop

The politics of the weekly shop

New app reveals political leanings of food companies
Beam me up, Scottie!

Beam me up, Scottie!

Celebrity Trekkies from Alex Salmond to Barack Obama
Beware Wet Paint: The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition

Beware Wet Paint

The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition
Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

Can 'The Endless River' carry on the tradition?
Sanctuary for the suicidal

Sanctuary for the suicidal

One mother's story of how London charity Maytree helped her son with his depression
A roller-coaster tale from the 'voice of a generation'

Not That Kind of Girl:

A roller-coaster tale from 'voice of a generation' Lena Dunham
London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice. In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence

London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice

In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence
Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with Malcolm McLaren

Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with McLaren

Designer 'felt pressured' into going out with Sex Pistols manager
Jourdan Dunn: Model mother

Model mother

Jordan Dunn became one of the best-paid models in the world
Apple still coolest brand – despite U2 PR disaster

Apple still the coolest brand

Despite PR disaster of free U2 album
Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

Scrambled eggs and LSD

Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

New leading ladies of dance fight back

How female vocalists are now writing their own hits