2009 Open diary: Rose gets one over 16th

When Tom Watson called Turnberry "defenceless" on Thursday, he was overlooking the new 16th hole. A once-easy downhill par-four has been turned into a treacherous dog-leg which swings right and over a deep creek angled in front of the green.

On day one, into the breeze, it ruined many promising rounds. Fredrik Jacobson approached on minus four and was rocked back by a triple bogey, and the list of double bogeys was an Open who's who: Graeme McDowell, Lee Westwood, Sergio Garcia, Soren Kjeldsen, Adam Scott, Kenny Perry, Chad Campbell, Anthony Kim, KJ Choi and Greg Norman were among their number. It is Turnberry's car-crash corner, and the stands are full to bursting itching to see pros come a cropper.

But yesterday, with the wind helping, the hole was kinder. The front pin obliged them to bring the ball over the flag and putt back towards the hazard, and some overdid it. It flummoxed Kjeldsen again – he took an eight; and JB Holmes crashed it into the spectator stand behind the green, and had to hole a tough return for a bogey. But Justin Rose showed how to do it with a trickle-down putt for birdie that helped keep him in the tournament.

Focus on Ishikawa stops Woods clicking into gear

Despite Angel Cabrera's famous remark that "other players have psychologists – I just smoke", the fact is that not many of the golfers light up out there. Miguel Angel Jimenez has his cherished post-round cigar; Darren Clarke likes the odd puff; and John Daly hits driver on the practice tee with a cigarette clamped between his teeth. This is a tribute to their self-control, because the game's neurotic stresses are there for all to see.

It cannot have been easy for Sergio Garcia, wedged between the oldest man in the tournament and the youngest, to continue thinking of himself as "El Niño". And one factor in the poor form of Tiger Woods in the first round may lie in the circus surrounding his glamorous Japanese partner, 17-year-old Ryo Ishikawa.

Woods is well used to the media scrum, of course – but it was a new experience for him to have scores of cameramen (40 or 50 on the first tee alone) snapping pictures of... someone else.

Imada takes it breezy on heavenly 17th hole

Everyone knows that the wind makes Turnberry a different course, and yesterday proved it. In practice, and on day one, the 17th was an into-the-wind beast (Westwood hit two drivers and still did not make the green). But with the breeze reversed it became an eagle opportunity at a crucial time in the round. Ryuji Imada holed from 40 feet to make the cut; Padraig Harrington and Tom Lehman both birdied it – even a deflated Ian Poulter had his only birdie in two days here – to edge them inside the mark. Carl Pettersson, meanwhile, eagled it to reach 11 over par, and beamed with relief – 13 over would have been awful.

Radio no substitute for Daly dose of live action

It's an Open secret that to enjoy wandering the links you need a neck-strung portable radio. It is the only way to keep track of goings-on. But the earphoned crowd begins to titter when it becomes obvious that the commentary team is watching the championship on TV. You can sit in the stands around the 18th green, watch John Daly chip up to the hole – and a few minutes later the radio cuts, as if live, to here comes Daly, chipping at 18. Or perhaps, at the Open, time really does stand still.

Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services

Day In a Page

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

This was the year of 24-carat Golden Oldies
Paris Fashion Week

Paris Fashion Week

Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
A year of the caliphate:

Isis, a year of the caliphate

Who can defeat the so-called 'Islamic State' – and how?
Marks and Spencer: Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?

Marks and Spencer

Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?
'We haven't invaded France': Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak

'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

They’re here to help

We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?
Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

'Heritage' is a loaded word in the Dixie, but the Charleston killings show how dangerous it is to cling to a deadly past, says Rupert Cornwell
What exactly does 'one' mean? Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue

What exactly does 'one' mean?

Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue
E L James's book Grey is a reminder of how the phenomenon of the best-seller works

Grey is a reminder of how the phenomenon of the best-seller works

It's hard to understand why so many are buying it – but then best-selling was ever an inexact science, says DJ Taylor
Behind the scenes of the world's most experimental science labs

World's most experimental science labs

The photographer Daniel Stier has spent four years gaining access to some of the world's most curious scientific experiments
It's the stroke of champions - so why is the single-handed backhand on the way out?

Single-handed backhand: on the way out?

If today's young guns wish to elevate themselves to the heights of Sampras, Graf and Federer, it's time to fire up the most thrilling shot in tennis
HMS Saracen: Meeting the last survivor of a submarine found 72 years after it was scuttled

HMS Saracen

Meeting the last survivor of a submarine found 72 years after it was scuttled
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Martine Wright lost both legs in the attack – she explains how her experience since shows 'anything is possible'

7/7 bombings 10 years on

Martine Wright lost both legs in the attack – she explains how her experience since shows 'anything is possible'