Racing: 214th Derby: Tenby's fallibility to be laid bare by Barathea: The favourite's odds are those of a champion but his form is unconvincing and the way is open for an upset at Epsom this afternoon

ACCORDING to the betting market, the 214th Derby is on the verge of being won by one of the most outstanding racechorses in the history of the race.

If, as expected, Tenby goes off at 4-7 there will have been only eight horses to have run at shorter odds. Henry Cecil's colt will be more fancied than Nashwan, more fancied than Shergar, and even more fancied even than Nijinsky.

Yet the form book shows that he has no right to such cramped odds. In two uncompetitive races this season, Tenby has beaten just six different horses, none of which has caused a disturbance in the top forum of Group races.

Instead, the little bay owes his advanced position to the fact that he is unbeaten, and almost unbeatable according to his trainer and Pat Eddery, the colt's his regular jockey.

Eddery has made Tenby his chosen one above two other animals trained by Cecil and owned by Khalid Abdullah, Armiger, who may run in Sunday's Prix du Jockey Club (French Derby), and Commander In Chief, the Warren Place second string today.

Commander In Chief will have to drag an onerous statistic around the course with him, for not since Morston in 1973 has a horse unraced at two taken the Derby. Certainly, Eddery considered the colt much too callow a customer after riding him to a narrow victory at York.

Much the same as Tenby, Commander In Chief has a reputation built on a 100per cent record and warm assessments from his training camp. His home workouts have always been impressive, but, for the first time today, he moves from weights in the garage to the Mr Universe stage, and the occasion may be too much for him.

Cecil has won the Derby twice, but today's Classic features a man who has saddled as many Epsom winners as the rest of the trainers put together, Vincent O'Brien.

The master of Ballydoyle House has been associated with names such as Sir Ivor, Nijinsky and The Minstrel in his victories on the Surrey Downs, and today links up yet again with a human whose name, who, for most many people, is probably racing itself, Lester Piggott.

Since the partnership's glory days on the cusp of the 1970s, in the late Sixties and Seventies, the faces have grown more lined and bedtimes have been brought forward. Victory for them here would repeat the vision that has recently flickered into the minds of romantics after lights out.

Their representative this year is Fatherland, who, like The Minstrel in 1977, comes to Epsom after earning Piggott's selection by running into the frame in the Irish 2,000 Guineas. Like many before him, Fatherland is sent into battle with doubts over his stamina. The reputations of countless fast horses have been buried in the Epsom straight, but, just occasionally, like Dr Devious Sir Ivor last year, in 1968, good animals can eke out their speed. stamina.

O'Brien has a clear view of his colt's prospects. 'The advantages for Epsom are that the horse has a good action, is well balanced and has show shown good form in Group One races,' he said. 'The disadvantage is that he may not stay the distance.'

Similar doubts are transported in the thoughts of held by Luca Cumani, whose Barathea beat Fatherland in the Irish Guineas, two weeks after finishing runner-up to Zafonic in the Newmarket Guineas. In that race, Barathea showed acceleration; today he also has to display application.

'Going into the Bushes in the Guineas, Zafonic was behind me and I thought that if anything came past me now it must be a hell of a horse,' Michael Roberts, Barathea's rider, remembers. recalls. 'And Zafonic did. My fellow quickened up really well but Zafonic quickened up even better and on the day he was a great winner,. But if he hadn't been there I would have been the great winner.'

While the crowd reaction tomorrow will suggests the decisive moments are contained within come in the Derby's final furlong, of the Derby, Roberts knows the overriding passage key period will have occurred well before then. By the time the main crest is reached and the swirling descent that is Tattenham Corner lies below, the South African will realise his fate.

'I'll have to nurse him to get the trip and that's going to be the key,' he said. 'The horse is going to need to be relaxed up the hill and then coasting coming down the other side.

'If I'm still there and running 1 furlongs out then Tenby is going to have to be very good to beat us. I've got speed, whereas the other horses are gallopers.'

Barathea also has the promise promises of rewarding to reward Sheikh Mohammed's for his multi-million pound investment in the sport. The world's most powerful owner since usurping Robert Sangster has never even reached the frame in the race he values above all others. Sangster himself is still around and has two runners today, one of which, Cairo Prince, has all the hallmarks of being the best outsider.

Cairo Prince's trainer, Peter Chapple-Hyam, has run horses against Tenby and Commander In Chief and knows the former to be superior, but has no form line to the one proven horse in the highest echelon, Barathea.

The choice for punters then in the 214th Derby is quite clear: it is Fatherland for the sentimental, Tenby for the unoriginal and BARATHEA (nap 3.45) for the sensible.

(Photograph omitted)

(Graphic omitted)

PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Voices
Chris Grayling, Justice Secretary: 'There are pressures which we are facing but there is not a crisis'
voices

Does Chris Grayling realise what a vague concept he is dealing with?

News
Brian Harvey turned up at Downing Street today demanding to speak to the Prime Minister

Met Police confirm it was a 'minor disturbance' and no-one was arrested

News
Blackpool is expected to become one of the first places to introduce the Government’s controversial new Public Space Protection Orders (PSPOs)
news

Concerns raised phenomenon is threatening resort's image as a family destination

Life and Style
gaming

I Am Bread could actually be a challenging and nuanced title

News
Nigel Farage has backed DJ Mike Read's new Ukip song
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Shia LaBeouf plays a World War II soldier in forthcoming drama Fury
films

Eccentric Fury star, 28, reveals he is 'not a really confident actor'

Life and Style
Time and Oak have developed a product that allows drinkers to customise the flavour and improve the quality of cheaper whiskey
food + drink

Sport
football

Peter Biaksangzuala died from his injuries in hospital on Sunday

Life and Style
The final 12 acts will be facing Simon Cowell, Cheryl Fernandez-Versini, Mel B and Louis Walsh tonight
fashion

The X Factor's judges colourful outfit was mocked by Simon Cowell

News
news

Footage shot by a passerby shows moment an ill man was carried out of his burning home

News
people
Latest in Sport
Sport
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Software Developer

£35000 - £45000 Per Annum Pensions Scheme After 6 Months: Clearwater People So...

Systems Analyst / Business Analyst - Central London

£35000 - £37000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: Systems Analyst / Busines...

Senior Change Engineer (Network, Cisco, Juniper) £30k

£30000 - £35000 per annum + Benefits: Ampersand Consulting LLP: Senior Change ...

Senior Change Engineer (Windows, Linux, VMWare) - London £35k

£30000 - £35000 per annum + Benefits: Ampersand Consulting LLP: Senior Change ...

Day In a Page

Oscar Pistorius sentencing: The athlete's wealth and notoriety have provoked a long overdue debate on South African prisons

'They poured water on, then electrified me...'

If Oscar Pistorius is sent to jail, his experience will not be that of other inmates
James Wharton: The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

The former Guard now fighting discrimination against gay soldiers

Life after the Army has brought new battles for the LGBT activist James Wharton
Ebola in the US: Panic over the virus threatens to infect President Obama's midterms

Panic over Ebola threatens to infect the midterms

Just one person has died, yet November's elections may be affected by what Republicans call 'Obama's Katrina', says Rupert Cornwell
Premier League coaches join the RSC to swap the tricks of their trades

Darling, you were fabulous! But offside...

Premier League coaches are joining the RSC to learn acting skills, and in turn they will teach its actors to play football. Nick Clark finds out why
How to dress with authority: Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear

How to dress with authority

Kirsty Wark and Camila Batmanghelidjh discuss the changing role of fashion in women's workwear
New book on Joy Division's Ian Curtis sheds new light on the life of the late singer

New book on Ian Curtis sheds fresh light on the life of the late singer

'Joy Division were making art... Ian was for real' says author Jon Savage
Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

Sean Harris: A rare interview with British acting's secret weapon

The Bafta-winner talks Hollywood, being branded a psycho, and how Barbra Streisand is his true inspiration
Tim Minchin, interview: The musician, comedian and world's favourite ginger is on scorching form

Tim Minchin interview

For a no-holds-barred comedian who is scathing about woolly thinking and oppressive religiosity, he is surprisingly gentle in person
Boris Johnson's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Boris's boozing won't win the puritan vote

Many of us Brits still disapprove of conspicuous consumption – it's the way we were raised, says DJ Taylor
Ash frontman Tim Wheeler reveals how he came to terms with his father's dementia

Tim Wheeler: Alzheimer's, memories and my dad

Wheeler's dad suffered from Alzheimer's for three years. When he died, there was only one way the Ash frontman knew how to respond: with a heartfelt solo album
Hugh Bonneville & Peter James: 'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'

How We Met: Hugh Bonneville & Peter James

'Peter loves his classic cars; I've always pootled along fine with a Mini Metro. I think I lack his panache'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's heavenly crab dishes don't need hours of preparation

Bill Granger's heavenly crab recipes

Scared off by the strain of shelling a crab? Let a fishmonger do the hard work so you can focus on getting the flavours right
Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

Radamel Falcao: How faith and love drive the Colombian to glory

After a remarkable conversion from reckless defender to prolific striker, Monaco's ace says he wants to make his loan deal at Old Trafford permanent
Terry Venables: Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England

Terry Venables column

Premier League managers must not be allowed to dictate who plays and who does not play for England
The Inside Word: Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past

Michael Calvin's Inside Word

Brendan Rodgers looks to the future while Roy Hodgson is ghost of seasons past