Shoot-out breaks England hearts

Glenn Moore reports from Wembley England (1) 1 Germany (1) 1 Shearer 3 Kuntz 16 Att: 75,862 after extra time, Germany win 6-5 on penalt ies

Six years on from a hot steamy night in Turin it came down to the agony of penalties once more. This time it was a warm, sticky night in north London but, once again, Germany were the victors.

The first 10 penalties were all successful. Then Gareth Southgate failed, but Andreas Moller did not. Germany now go on to meet the Czech Republic, who defeated France on penalties earlier in the afternoon, in the European Championship final on Sunday.

England are left to play the role of hosts. History, and the traditional love of the underdog, will ensure the Czechs get substantial support but there will be no great demand for tickets. The coach, Terry Venables, moves on, maybe to Porto, or simply to the courtroom, with his reputation at a high. He bequeaths to Glenn Hoddle a team rich in promise and suffused with self-belief.

It was a cruel way to end his reign and one spectator, more than any other, will know how Venables feels this morning. Watching from the Royal Box was Bobby Robson, whose England team lost to Germany on penalties in the World Cup semi-finals in 1990.

The parallels were uncanny. That night England, through Chris Waddle, had hit the post in extra time. Last night it was another Spurs winger, Darren Anderton, who struck the woodwork, two minutes into the extra period. If it had gone in England, under the "golden goal" ruling, would now be in the final. The Germans could point to a disallowed goal, headed in by Stefan Kuntz four minutes later. But Sandor Puhl, the referee, made few mistakes last night and he was probably correct in disallowing that one for pushing.

Kuntz it was who had earlier scored Germany's equaliser, after 16 minutes, Alan Shearer having put England ahead after just two. The match was all that could be asked of such an occasion. It would, as Stuart Pearce said afterwards, have "graced any final". It was always competitive, often enthralling, and marked with moments of high quality. The bulk of them came from England who dominated the second half and much of extra time. It was indicative that the outstanding player on the night was Dieter Eilts, Germany's defensive midfielder, who ended the night as an auxiliary centre-half after an injury to Thomas Helmer.

Helmer, Steffen Freund - who was also injured - and Jurgen Klinsmann - who did not play - are all doubtful for the final. With Moller and Stefan Reuter also missing - having been booked for the second time - Germany could be down to a dozen outfield players.

Both coaches fielded unexpected selections. Venables picked David Platt in a five-man midfield, leaving out Phil Neville and playing Southgate on the right of a three-man defence. It was his fourth position of the tournament. Berti Vogts opted to field one striker, Kuntz, and flood their midfield.

With so many players in that area the game could have stagnated. That it did not was due to the approach of both sides, notably England, and the early goal. It came from a corner earned by Ince with a rasping 25- yard drive which Andreas Kopke punched over. As Paul Gascoigne jogged up to take it, Shearer went to stand behind Teddy Sheringham and Markus Babbel was left marking both. As the corner dipped over Christian Ziege to Tony Adams, Shearer, then 16 yards out, began his move. Adams' flick- on carried the ball over Matthias Sammer and, arriving unchallenged, four yards out, was Shearer.

The rest was inevitable and the stadium - apart from one red, black and yellow segment - exploded with joy. "Three Lions" rang out and England charged into their opponents. A sterner referee might have booked Gascoigne as he clattered into Sammer - and Sheringham who risked a critical second yellow card with strong dissent. Puhl, however, understood the nature and importance of the occasion and made allowances. Bayern Munich's Mehmet Scholl, renewing Uefa Cup rivalry with Stuart Pearce, was similarly forgiven.

Barely 15 minutes had gone but it was already a better contest than the afternoon semi-final. Then it stepped up another gear as Germany equalised. Moller, under pressure from Gascoigne on the edge of the England area, squeezed a reverse pass to Helmer on the left. As Southgate appealed for offside the big centre-half turned sweetly and drove the ball across goal. First to react was Kuntz, sliding in ahead of Pearce at the far post to score. It was his first goal since 7 September 1994, the same day Shearer's infamous drought had started. This was Kuntz's 16th game since and his delight was evident.

England struggled to come to terms with the goal and, for a while, the Germans were in the ascendant. But England ended the half stronger and twice went close to scoring. In a move familiar to White Hart Lane regulars Anderton pulled a corner back to Sheringham who, having found space, drove first time for goal. But barring the way was Reuter who cleared off the line. Then, from an Anderton cross, Shearer headed just past the far post.

The second period was tighter, Ince and Helmer shot over and Gascoigne twice almost opened Germany up but, almost inevitably, the match went into extra time. In other games the "golden goal" has led to sterility but England roared forward and within two minutes McManaman had crossed from the byline and Anderton, under pressure from Kopke, hit the post. As Kopke turned, the rebound flew into his arms.

Seaman then tipped a Moller shot over, Kuntz had his goal disallowed and Gascoigne was inches away from toe-poking in a Shearer cross. Nerves frayed. Finally, after Ziege had gone close one last time there came the dreaded penalty-shoot-out.

Shearer, Platt, the courageous Pearce, Gascoigne and Sheringham all scored. So did their German counterparts. Then Southgate slid his too slow and too low to Kopke's right. The nation looked to Seaman again but he had no heroics left. Moller - who knew his final had already gone - stepped up and blasted the ball into the roof of the net.

News
people'It can last and it's terrifying'
Sport
Danny Welbeck's Manchester United future is in doubt
footballStriker in talks over £17m move from Manchester United
Sport
Radamel Falcao
footballManchester United agree loan deal for Monaco striker Falcao
Sport
Louis van Gaal, Radamel Falcao, Arturo Vidal, Mats Hummels and Javier Hernandez
footballFalcao, Hernandez, Welbeck and every deal live as it happens
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Sport
footballFeaturing Bart Simpson
News
Kelly Brook
peopleA spokesperson said the support group was 'extremely disappointed'
Sport
Andy Murray celebrates a shot while playing Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
TennisWin sets up blockbuster US Open quarter-final against Djokovic
News
i100
Life and Style
techIf those brochure kitchens look a little too perfect to be true, well, that’s probably because they are
Arts and Entertainment
Alex Kapranos of Franz Ferdinand performs live
music Pro-independence show to take place four days before vote
News
news Video - hailed as 'most original' since Benedict Cumberbatch's
Life and Style
The longer David Sedaris had his Fitbit, the further afield his walks took him through the West Sussex countryside
lifeDavid Sedaris: What I learnt from my fitness tracker about the world
Arts and Entertainment
Word master: Self holds up a copy of his novel ‘Umbrella’
boksUnlike 'talented mediocrity' George Orwell, you must approach this writer dictionary in hand
News
i100
Life and Style
tech

Apple agrees deal with Visa on contactless payments

Caption competition
Caption competition
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Career Services
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

SQL Implementation Consultant (VB,C#, SQL, Java, Eclipse, integ

£40000 - £50000 per annum + benefits+bonus+package: Harrington Starr: SQL Impl...

SQL Technical Implementation Consultant (Java, BA, Oracle, VBA)

£45000 - £55000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: SQL Technical ...

Head of IT (Windows, Server, VMware, SAN, Fidessa, Equities)

£85000 per annum: Harrington Starr: Head of IT (Windows, Server, VMware, SAN, ...

Lead C# Developer (.Net, nHibernate, MVC, SQL) Surrey

£55000 - £60000 per annum + Benefits + Bonus: Harrington Starr: Lead C# Develo...

Day In a Page

Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor