Andy Murray bemused by Montreal defeat

Andy Murray was at a loss to explain why he was always on the back foot as he went down to a miserable 6-3 6-1 defeat to Kevin Anderson in the Rogers Cup in Montreal.

The world number four was never in the match in which he served five double faults with his opponent, ranked 31 places below him, refusing to allow the Scot to settle as his attempt to defend his title disintegrated at the first hurdle.



The 25-year-old South African played with an intensity and aggression that prevented Murray from finding any rhythm, dictating play as he bossed the Scot around the court and growing in confidence as the match continued.



Murray saw his serve desert him and the match was scattered with unforced errors as he lost in an hour and 10 minutes.



It was a less than an ideal start to his build-up for the US Open which begins in less than three weeks in New York.



The 24-year-old could not put his finger on what was behind such a comprehensive loss after time spent preparing in Miami.



Murray said in quotes reported on atpworldtour.com: "Sometimes you can make mistakes with your preparation, but I've done pretty similar stuff to what I've always done coming in here. It's just a really bad day.



"It's happened to me a couple times this year and also last year, as well.



"I just felt very slow. I couldn't get anything going. I started both sets really, really badly which doesn't help against someone that serves like Kevin.



"Every time he came to the net, I was a bit late getting to the ball. I was getting behind very early in all of the rallies and didn't move particularly well."



A flying start by Anderson left Murray playing catch-up as the South African went in to a 3-0 lead, with the Scot serving up two double faults in his first service game.



Murray finally got on the board in the fourth game and the match went with serve before Anderson took a 5-2 lead.



The Dunblane-born player then held but it was merely delaying the inevitable, Anderson ending the set the way he started it, serving out with an ace.



Murray then began the second set with a double fault as Anderson was relentless, forcing his way to double break point and going 1-0 up before holding.



The Briton held but it was the final game he would win, producing double faults, unforced errors and generally poor play.



Anderson told Sky Sports 4: "Andy is a great player and has had an incredible career.



"I knew it was going to be tough.



"The last time I played Andy was in Australia and I didn't come forward very well.



"I knew I had to come in.



"I played some good points and I won the majority of those."



PROMOTED VIDEO
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

Woman who was sent to three Nazi death camps describes how she escaped the gas chamber

Auschwitz liberation 70th anniversary

Woman sent to three Nazi death camps describes surviving gas chamber
DSK, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel

The inside track on France's trial of the year

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Dodo the Pimp, and the Carlton Hotel:
As provocative now as they ever were

Sarah Kane season

Why her plays are as provocative now as when they were written
Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of a killing in Iraq 11 years ago

Murder of Japanese hostage has grim echoes of another killing

Japanese mood was against what was seen as irresponsible trips to a vicious war zone
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea