Australian Open 2014: Andy Murray wins 23 consecutive points to clinch victory over Vincent Millot and move into third round

Murray won 6-2 6-2 7-5 after coming from 5-1 down in the third set

You have to win 24 points in a row to achieve tennis perfection – a “golden set” is won 6-0 without dropping a point – and Andy Murray went close to doing his version of the achievement at the Australian Open on Thursday. The 26-year-old Scot won the last 23 points of his second-round match against France’s Vincent Millot, though he did so only after digging himself out of trouble in a remarkable third set.

Millot, who is the French No 25, had gone two sets down when he decided to throw caution to the wind. The 27-year-old world No 267 forced a set point after racing into a 5-1 lead, only for Murray to play superbly on the next 23 points and win the match. Having saved the set point with a backhand winner, Murray went on to win six games in a row and clinch the match 6-2, 6-2, 7-5 to earn a third-round meeting with Spain’s Feliciano Lopez on Saturday.

“I was trying to remind myself when I was 5-1 down that if I could just hang in there and weather the storm a little bit, I might be able to come back,” Murray said afterwards. “At 6-5 when I went to serve for it someone shouted out: ‘You’ve won 19 points in a row.’ I would say that’s probably the most I’d ever won in my career by far. It’s a very difficult thing to do. I don’t really know how I did it.”

The American Bill Scanlon is the only man who has won a “golden set” in the Open era, when he beat Brazil’s Marcos Hocevar at Delray Beach in 1983. Yaroslava Shvedova became the first woman to perform the feat in the Open era when she beat Sara Errani at Wimbledon two summers ago.

A patchy performance by Murray was partly explained by the conditions. After temperatures in excess of 43C during the day, the roof over Rod Laver Arena was shut in the afternoon. In the early evening there was a thunder storm and by the time Murray and Millot went on court just before 10pm – with the roof open again – the humidity had soared. The temperature had fallen, but the air temperature was still a steamy 28C.

“It was so humid,” Murray said. “It changed the way the court and the balls played a lot. It was heavier. There were a lot of balls in the net today. It slowed everything down a bit.”

 

Millot came out fighting in the third set Millot came out fighting in the third set  

Murray has beaten Lopez in all seven of their previous meetings, though the 32-year-old Spaniard ran him close over four sets at the US Open two summers ago. “He’s got a great serve,” Murray said. “He obviously comes to the net a bit. He has a different game style to pretty much all of the guys nowadays.”

Millot also has a different hair style nowadays, having shorn off his flowing locks. “I was in the ice bath with him after our first-round match and talking to him about it,” Murray said. “He got the all-clear from his girlfriend before he did it – no bets or New Year resolutions. For me his hair was something that made him Feliciano. He’s a bit different now.”  Lopez, who admitted he would have to “do something different and go for it” in order to reverse his fortunes against Murray, said he might let his hair grow again but had not decided. “We’ll see,” he said. “If I keep winning I will leave it like this.”

Play on a weather-hit day went past midnight and the biggest shock came at the end. Juan Martin del Potro, the world No 5, became the first major casualty in the men’s draw when he lost 4-6, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4, 7-5 to Spain’s Roberto world No 62 Bautista Agut.

During the hottest part of the day Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer took advantage of more comfortable conditions as the retractable roofs over the two main stadiums were shut. Nadal beat the Australian teenager Thanasi Kokkinakis 6-2, 6-4, 6-2 in Rod Laver Arena, while Federer beat Slovenia’s Blaz Kavcic 6-2,  6-1, 7-6 in Hisense Arena. It was the first time in 10 years that Federer has played a match here on any court other than Rod Laver Arena. 

 

PROMOTED VIDEO
Travel
travel
News
news
News
Sir James Dyson: 'Students must be inspired to take up the challenge of engineering'
i100
Life and Style
Apple showed no sign of losing its talent for product launches with the new, slightly larger iPhone 6 making headlines
techSecurity breaches and overhyped start-ups dominated a year in which very little changed (save the size of your phone)
Arts and Entertainment
Catherine (Sarah Lancashire) in Happy Valley ((C) Red Productions/Ben Blackall)
TV
Caption competition
Caption competition
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Daily Quiz
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

A timely reminder of the bloody anniversary we all forgot

Who remembers that this week we enter the 150th anniversary year of the end of the American Civil War, asks Robert Fisk
Homeless Veterans appeal: Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served

Homeless Veterans appeal

Former soldiers pay their respects to a friend who also served
Downfall of Dustin 'Screech' Diamond, the 'Saved By The Bell' star charged with bar stabbing

Scarred by the bell

The downfall of the TV star charged with bar stabbing
Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Why 2014 was a year of technological let-downs

Security breaches and overhyped start-ups dominated a year in which very little changed (save the size of your phone)
Cuba's golf revolution: But will the revolutionary nation take 'bourgeois' game to its heart?

Will revolutionary Cuba take 'bourgeois' golf to its heart?

Fidel Castro ridiculed the game – but now investment in leisure resort projects is welcome
The Locked Room Mysteries: As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor Otto Penzler explains the rules of engagement

The Locked Room Mysteries

As a new collection of the genre’s best is published, its editor explains the rules of engagement
Amy Adams on playing painter Margaret Keane in Tim Burton's Big Eyes

How I made myself Keane

Amy Adams hadn’t wanted to take the role of artist Margaret Keane, because she’d had enough of playing victims. But then she had a daughter, and saw the painter in a new light
Ed Richards: Parting view of Ofcom chief. . . we hate jokes on the disabled

Parting view of Ofcom chief... we hate jokes on the disabled

Bad language once got TV viewers irate, inciting calls to broadcasting switchboards. But now there is a worse offender, says retiring head of the media watchdog, Ed Richards
A look back at fashion in 2014: Wear in review

Wear in review

A look back at fashion in 2014
Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015. Might just one of them happen?

Ian Herbert: My 10 hopes for sport in 2015

Might just one of them happen?
War with Isis: The West needs more than a White Knight

The West needs more than a White Knight

Despite billions spent on weapons, the US has not been able to counter Isis's gruesome tactics, says Patrick Cockburn
Return to Helmand: Private Davey Graham recalls the day he was shot by the Taliban

'The day I was shot by the Taliban'

Private Davey Graham was shot five times during an ambush in 2007 - it was the first, controversial photograph to show the dangers our soldiers faced in Helmand province
Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Revealed: the best and worst airlines for delays

Many flyers are failing to claim compensation to which they are entitled, a new survey has found
The stories that defined 2014: From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions

The stories that defined 2014

From the Scottish independence referendum to the Ice Bucket Challenge, our writers voice their opinions
Stoke-on-Trent becomes first British city to be classified as 'disaster resilient' by the United Nations

Disaster looming? Now you know where to head...

Which British city has become the first to be awarded special 'resilience' status by the UN?