European School of Osteopathy

 

History: Founded in Paris, 1951, moved to England in 1965. The integrated Masters in osteopathy degree programme offered by the ESO replaces and upgrades the BSc(Hons) and the DO qualifications formerly awarded to osteopathic graduates. The ESO is a partner college of the University of Greenwich and the University of Wales.

Address: First and second-year students are based at Boxley House, a mansion on the outskirts of Maidstone, Kent, while third and fourth years spend a greater part of their time in the town centre teaching clinic where the main focus of the training is the acquisition of practical skills.

Ambience: Boxley House is set in an area of outstanding natural beauty. The school prides itself on its international reputation and there are around 20 different nationalities represented. Maidstone itself is the County Town of Kent and offers a mix of shopping and entertainment.

Who's the boss? Mr Adrian Barnes MSc(Ost), DO. He has been qualified since 1978 and has a keen interest in the philosophy of medicine.

Prospectus: 01622 671 558 or view it online here.

UCAS code: E80 (institution) and B310 (course).

What you need to know

Easy to get into? Not particularly. A typical offer would be BCC at A-level, to include biology or human biology plus one other in a science subject, preferably chemistry. Successful applicants are invited to attend an interview.

Foundation courses: One (non-UCAS). Four-week Summer Science Course running from mid-July to mid-August each year with at least three days per week class contact from 9am-5pm. Aimed at those who do not have the required science background to meet the entry requirements but have proven study skills and wish to join the ESO programme.

Vital statistics: 250 students. During the course they acquire 1,000 hours of supervised clinical experience and see around 50 new patients.

Added value: The ESO teaching clinic is well established and students carry out in excess of 20,000 treatments each year. The course also incorporates training in cranial osteopathy.

Teaching: The course is full time and comprises theory and practical training. The school is part of the Osteopathic European Academic Network (OSEAN), which strives to develop a standardised model of osteopathic education across the Continent.

Any accommodation? None offered by the college but dedicated student accommodation is available in Maidstone town centre. The college also supply vacancy lists of private housing in the surrounding area and endeavour to help students find somewhere to live. Most people share houses with other ESO students.

Cheap to live there? You should expect to pay upwards of £60 per week. Local paper The Kent Messenger, out every Friday, provides listings of affordable property for rent in the area.

Transport links: Trains from Maidstone to London are frequent, and the journey takes about 50 minutes. Considered England's gateway to Europe, Kent is easily accessible from the continent via the Channel Tunnel and Ferry Ports.

Fees: £9,000 per year for full-time UK and EU undergraduates. For overseas students the yearly fees are £9,850.

Bursaries: Scholarships and bursaries are all awarded through the University of Greenwich. The National Scholarship Programme financially assists those from households with an annual income below £25,000. For full details, see here.

The fun stuff

Nightlife: Picturesque villages in the surrounding area offer a choice of pubs and restaurants, while Maidstone itself offers a number of venues including a multiplex cinema, a theatre, numerous clubs and a selection of trendy bars and restaurants.

Price of a pint: Kent is pretty pricey but head to chain bars for cheaper drinks.

Sporting reputation: No entry in the BUCS league table, but a range of sporting activities are on offer in the impressive grounds. Horse-riding is possible with the riding school just a ten minute walk from the main site.

Glittering alumni: Famous names in the world of osteopathy, including Peter Blagrave, Renzo Molinari and Alain Abehsera.

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