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Isabel Taylor and Duncan MacWatt assumed their precious photos had been lost forever when Mrs Taylor dropped a bag containing a memory card

Parents defend terror case Briton

The parents of a pregnant British mother accused of being part of a US terrorism plot have protested her innocence, it emerged today.

Michael McCarthy: So far BP has said the right words – but its actions will be measured now

BP's statement yesterday obeyed PR rule No.1 for a firm which, directly or not, has outraged the public: don't quibble

One man on a bike, from Argentina to Alaska

In June, English teacher Simon Perry embarks on a 19,000-mile charity cycle ride from the bottom of Argentina to the top of Alaska

Wolves blamed for teacher Candice Berner's death in Alaska

A post-mortem concluded that a rural US teacher was killed by animals, and the head of the Alaska State Troopers said wolves are the likely suspect.

Man who captured whales at feeding time – from his kayak

Paddling in a tiny kayak, an intrepid photographer captured the moment when rare humpback whales emerge from the deep to feed off the shores of Alaska.

Palin's daughter loses fight for secret custody hearing

The daughter of former vice presidential hopeful Sarah Palin has lost her bid to keep a bitter custody dispute over her year-old son confidential.

Where the wild things are: Two British artists head to Alaska's frozen north on the trail of the polar bear

Nestled in the vast tundra of Alaska's North Slope, the island of Kaktovik is hard to spot on a map. A remote region, surrounded by sea ice, it is part of a 19.6 million-acre area of Arctic wildlife reserve, and boasts a fierce natural environment. In winter, temperatures regularly drop to minus 20 degrees, and strong winds hurtle across the sprawling, snow-white plains – making this the ideal natural habitat for some of the 25,000 polar bears still living in the wild today, as well as caribou, Arctic fox and more than 125 species of bird.

The Sarah Palin phenomenon

The American right's darling sold a record-breaking 300,000 copies of her autobiography on day one. What does this say about the US?

Legend of a Suicide, By David Vann

The ghost of Hemingway stalks this haunting story

Letterman says wife 'horribly hurt' by sex scandal

Late-night TV host David Letterman has apologised to his wife on his Late Show, saying she had been "horribly hurt by my behaviour."

Tips and deals: 04/10/2009

The kit

Is it a pair of sunglasses, is it a cunningly disguised 4GB USB flash drive? It's both! These Calvin Klein shades would suit James Bond down to the ground. You, too, if you want to keep your computer files by your right temple. Price £120, go to marchon.com

Robert Fisk: Mangling everything in its path, Typhoon Sarah blows in to Asia

Our writer is there to witness the carnage as Alaska's former mom-in-chief touches down in Hong Kong

Guy Adams: The polar opposite to what I'd expected

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine