Arts and Entertainment Channel 4's series claims to shed light on life on benefits for residents of the street, including Smoggy pictured here

No one's done much to help the residents of James Turner Street in Birmingham, now forever rechristened Benefits Street, thanks to Channel 4's controversial new documentary series. Despite – or maybe because of – the Twitter death threats, accusations of betrayal and media uproar, which followed its first broadcast, Channel 4 has defied calls for the series to be pulled. Did it hope this second episode would change some minds?

PM signals support for anti-terror action in North Africa

MPs told groups linked to al-Qa’ida represent a 'large threat' needing a 'robust response'

'It was a very exciting episode. I enjoyed it:' Rescued hostage gives extraordinary account of Algerian gas field terror attack

The first British hostages to speak of their ordeal in the al-Qa’ida desert siege today expressed relief at their rescue and warmly praised the Algerian army. One unnamed hostage who appeared on Algerian state television said, extraordinarily: “It was a very exciting episode. I enjoyed it.”

Jim Armitage: Threat to Western workers from lower-paid labour

Global Outlook Oil, gas and mining engineers have been living high on the hog for much of the last decade, thanks to the surging prices of commodities.

Jim Armitage: As far as oil and gas workers are concerned, money trumps risk

Global Outlook Engineers are a tough breed. Oil and gas engineers the toughest of the bunch. You have to be to work in the kinds of places with the most oil. Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Libya, Pakistan, Africa. Where there's oil, there's trouble.

Editorial: David Cameron's mixed signals on terrorism

The official view is that the UK does not negotiate or pay ransom to kidnappers

Algeria hostage crisis: grim news that can be traced to the ‘triumphant’ removal of Gaddafi

Gaddafi’s overthrow broke all kinds of local ethnic, tribal and commercial bargains and power-broking arrangements that we never understood

'A very serious and dangerous situation': David Cameron chairs emergency meeting on Algerian hostage crisis

David Cameron chaired an emergency meeting today on the Algerian hostage crisis which Downing Street described as a “very serious and dangerous situation”.

Algeria crisis 'remains ongoing' after British hostages killed in Saharan bloodbath

Government dismay after Algerian forces attack Islamists at BP gas plant

Desert storm: Islamists take Mali fight to Algeria

Islamist militants were holding  up to 41 Western gas engineers at a remote BP site in Algeria today, deepening fears that the conflict in Mali could unleash an anti-Western war across the deserts of northern Africa.

Colosseum at El Jem

Tunisia: Treasures for the taking

It's been two years since the Arab Spring uprising, yet tourists have failed to return to Tunisia in any numbers. All the more reason to pay a visit

Algeria: Colonial past haunts François Hollande

President François Hollande has acknowledged that France’s colonisation of Algeria had been “brutal and unfair” but stopped short of making an apology to the oil-rich North African state.

In The Studio: Adel Abdessemed, artist

'When I make a line I make it like a scalpel. Drawings like cuts'

Rooney captained England once before, against Brazil in 2009

Sam Wallace: Giving the England captaincy to Wayne Rooney is not ideal – it's pragmatic

The simple answer is it was more trouble not to give him the captaincy

Bendjedid in 2010: he steered Algeria away from Soviet influence

Chadli Bendjedid: Politician whose reforming zeal led to bloodshed

Chadli Bendjedid was a former President of Algeria whose political fall coincided with the introduction of democratic reform which served only to spark a decade-long, bloody civil war. He became President in 1979, following the death of Houari Boumedienne, and declared at his inauguration that he had no interest in the wealth and honour that might be bestowed upon him, affirming that socialism was "an irreversible option for our country". In fact he set out to gradually rid Algeria of his predecessor's influence and his often repressive policies.

Ben Quilter takes the crowd’s acclaim after winning the bronze medal

Top seed Quilter fights back from disappointment to take bronze in judo

Ben Quilter overcame a disappointing start to the day to win judo bronze for Great Britain at the ExCeL last night.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

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Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
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Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent