Voices

A green, competitive Europe doesn’t need them and shouldn’t have them

Green power industry claims Government backtracking on solar

While sharply rising oil prices claim attention across the world, the British Government is facing increasingly vocal criticism over a policy on solar power subsidies that critics deride as "extraordinary".

Green energy spend hits £150bn in 2010

Global investment in green energy soared by 30 per cent to a record $243bn (£151bn) last year, according to figures released today.

Drax calls for biomass support

Drax, the owner and operator of the Drax coal-fired power plant, blamed the Government for not making full use of its biomass renewable energy facilities as it reported higher annual profits last night.

Co-op targets 20 million members

The Co-operative Group said it wants to increase its membership to 20 million over the next decade, as it unveiled 47 new targets to improve its ethical credentials.

Eaga agrees £306m offer from Carillion

Eaga, one of the UK's biggest suppliers of heating and renewable energy services, has agreed to a £306m takeover by the support services giant Carillion. Founded in 1990, Eaga employs about 4,000 people and is one of the UK's largest installers of central heating systems.

Commercial solar farms 'cashing in on scheme'

Concerns that commercial solar "farms" are cashing in on an incentive scheme designed to boost small-scale renewables is prompting the Government to review the programme.

Joint venture to lay North Sea cable

Five energy companies have joined forces to plan a power cable of between 1,200 and 2,000 megawatts to connect Scotland and Norway by 2020.

Let's float that idea... Boris's 2012 biosphere

A futuristic floating park has been proposed for the 2012 Olympics and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

New Zealand: Boy dies after fall into hot pool

A boy died in a New Zealand hospital after being scalded head to foot when he fell into a geothermal pool which could have been as hot as 100C.

Michael McCarthy: The ecological risks of clean energy's 'dirty little secret'

Producing rare-earth metals carries considerable environmental risks, not least because the ores in which they are found often contain thorium, radium and uranium, which are radioactive. Add to that the toxic acids involved in the refining process, and the "tailings", or waste sludge, from the mine can be very unpleasant indeed. Rare earths, which are widely used in such green energy applications as electric cars and wind turbines, have been referred to as "clean energy's dirty little secret".

Cash incentives for councils that sign up for new wind farms

Local councils are to get extra funding if they give the go-ahead to new wind farms, under plans to stop local communities sabotaging renewable energy projects.

Jeremy Leggett: Solar storm coming: the battle for the UK energy industry

Business Interview: Last week's Spending Review was just a skirmish in an industry 'civil war', the Solarcentury founder tells Sarah Arnott

UTC to buy Clipper Windpower

The wind turbine maker Clipper Windpower has agreed to a £139.5m buyout by the US conglomerate United Technologies Corporation. UTC will pay 65p a share to gain control over the 50.1 per cent stake in the AIM-listed Clipper that it does not already own and assist with cash flow ahead of the transaction. Last year, UTC, which provides hi-tech products and services to the building systems and aerospace industries, paid £166m for a 49.5 per cent stake in Clipper.

Leading article: Greener living comes at a price

We were disappointed that David Cameron made no reference to green issues in his speech to the Conservative conference. Indeed, he seems to have dropped environmentalism as if it were part of a pre-election rebranding exercise for which he has no use now that he has to attend to more important matters, such as imposing the biggest public-spending cuts since 1921.

Business Diary: A handbrake turn from BSM

The buyers at the British School of Motoring just can't seem to make up their minds. A little over a year ago, BSM dumped Vauxhall, its long-time supplier of motors, in favour of Fiat. The decision rather made one question the "British" claim made by the company's name, a point it now seems to have accepted too. Yesterday, BSM announced that from 2011 onwards, it will be dropping Fiat and buying its instructors' cars from, wait for it, Vauxhall. U-turns all over the road in other words.

Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935