Voices

A green, competitive Europe doesn’t need them and shouldn’t have them

Green power industry claims Government backtracking on solar

While sharply rising oil prices claim attention across the world, the British Government is facing increasingly vocal criticism over a policy on solar power subsidies that critics deride as "extraordinary".

Green energy spend hits £150bn in 2010

Global investment in green energy soared by 30 per cent to a record $243bn (£151bn) last year, according to figures released today.

Drax calls for biomass support

Drax, the owner and operator of the Drax coal-fired power plant, blamed the Government for not making full use of its biomass renewable energy facilities as it reported higher annual profits last night.

Co-op targets 20 million members

The Co-operative Group said it wants to increase its membership to 20 million over the next decade, as it unveiled 47 new targets to improve its ethical credentials.

Eaga agrees £306m offer from Carillion

Eaga, one of the UK's biggest suppliers of heating and renewable energy services, has agreed to a £306m takeover by the support services giant Carillion. Founded in 1990, Eaga employs about 4,000 people and is one of the UK's largest installers of central heating systems.

Commercial solar farms 'cashing in on scheme'

Concerns that commercial solar "farms" are cashing in on an incentive scheme designed to boost small-scale renewables is prompting the Government to review the programme.

Joint venture to lay North Sea cable

Five energy companies have joined forces to plan a power cable of between 1,200 and 2,000 megawatts to connect Scotland and Norway by 2020.

Let's float that idea... Boris's 2012 biosphere

A futuristic floating park has been proposed for the 2012 Olympics and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

New Zealand: Boy dies after fall into hot pool

A boy died in a New Zealand hospital after being scalded head to foot when he fell into a geothermal pool which could have been as hot as 100C.

Michael McCarthy: The ecological risks of clean energy's 'dirty little secret'

Producing rare-earth metals carries considerable environmental risks, not least because the ores in which they are found often contain thorium, radium and uranium, which are radioactive. Add to that the toxic acids involved in the refining process, and the "tailings", or waste sludge, from the mine can be very unpleasant indeed. Rare earths, which are widely used in such green energy applications as electric cars and wind turbines, have been referred to as "clean energy's dirty little secret".

Cash incentives for councils that sign up for new wind farms

Local councils are to get extra funding if they give the go-ahead to new wind farms, under plans to stop local communities sabotaging renewable energy projects.

Jeremy Leggett: Solar storm coming: the battle for the UK energy industry

Business Interview: Last week's Spending Review was just a skirmish in an industry 'civil war', the Solarcentury founder tells Sarah Arnott

UTC to buy Clipper Windpower

The wind turbine maker Clipper Windpower has agreed to a £139.5m buyout by the US conglomerate United Technologies Corporation. UTC will pay 65p a share to gain control over the 50.1 per cent stake in the AIM-listed Clipper that it does not already own and assist with cash flow ahead of the transaction. Last year, UTC, which provides hi-tech products and services to the building systems and aerospace industries, paid £166m for a 49.5 per cent stake in Clipper.

Leading article: Greener living comes at a price

We were disappointed that David Cameron made no reference to green issues in his speech to the Conservative conference. Indeed, he seems to have dropped environmentalism as if it were part of a pre-election rebranding exercise for which he has no use now that he has to attend to more important matters, such as imposing the biggest public-spending cuts since 1921.

Business Diary: A handbrake turn from BSM

The buyers at the British School of Motoring just can't seem to make up their minds. A little over a year ago, BSM dumped Vauxhall, its long-time supplier of motors, in favour of Fiat. The decision rather made one question the "British" claim made by the company's name, a point it now seems to have accepted too. Yesterday, BSM announced that from 2011 onwards, it will be dropping Fiat and buying its instructors' cars from, wait for it, Vauxhall. U-turns all over the road in other words.

Sport
The sun rises over St Andrews golf course, but will it be a new dawn for the Royal and Ancient Golf Club?
sportAnd it's Yes to women (at the R&A)
Arts and Entertainment
Friends is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year
tvSeries celebrates 20th anniversary
Sport
Yaya Touré (left) and Bayern Munich’s Spanish defender Juan Bernat
footballToure's lack of defensive work is big problem for City
Voices
voicesApple continually kill off smaller app developers, and that's no good for anyone
Arts and Entertainment
Liam Neeson said he wouldn't
tv

Liam Neeson's Downton dreams

Sport
Wembley Stadium
footballNews follows deal with Germany
Arts and Entertainment
A spell in the sun: Emma Stone and Colin Firth star in ‘Magic in the Moonlight’
filmReview: Magic In The Moonlight
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Panama
Languedoc Roussillon
Marrakesh & the Atlas Mountains
Bruges
The Jura Mountains
Dubrovnik & the Dalmatian Coast
Prices correct as of 17 September 2014
Mystery of the Ground Zero wedding photo

A shot in the dark

Mystery of the wedding photo from Ground Zero
His life, the universe and everything

His life, the universe and everything

New biography sheds light on comic genius of Douglas Adams
Save us from small screen superheroes

Save us from small screen superheroes

Shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D are little more than marketing tools
Reach for the skies

Reach for the skies

From pools to football pitches, rooftop living is looking up
These are the 12 best hotel spas in the UK

12 best hotel spas in the UK

Some hotels go all out on facilities; others stand out for the sheer quality of treatments
These Iranian-controlled Shia militias used to specialise in killing American soldiers. Now they are fighting Isis, backed up by US airstrikes

Widespread fear of Isis is producing strange bedfellows

Iranian-controlled Shia militias that used to kill American soldiers are now fighting Isis, helped by US airstrikes
Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Shoppers don't come to Topshop for the unique
How to make a Lego masterpiece

How to make a Lego masterpiece

Toy breaks out of the nursery and heads for the gallery
Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Urbanites are cursed with an acronym pointing to Employed but No Disposable Income or Savings
Paisley’s decision to make peace with IRA enemies might remind the Arabs of Sadat

Ian Paisley’s decision to make peace with his IRA enemies

His Save Ulster from Sodomy campaign would surely have been supported by many a Sunni imam
'She was a singer, a superstar, an addict, but to me, her mother, she is simply Amy'

'She was a singer, a superstar, an addict, but to me, her mother, she is simply Amy'

Exclusive extract from Janis Winehouse's poignant new memoir
Is this the role to win Cumberbatch an Oscar?

Is this the role to win Cumberbatch an Oscar?

The Imitation Game, film review
England and Roy Hodgson take a joint step towards redemption in Basel

England and Hodgson take a joint step towards redemption

Welbeck double puts England on the road to Euro 2016
Relatives fight over Vivian Maier’s rare photos

Relatives fight over Vivian Maier’s rare photos

Pictures removed from public view as courts decide ownership
‘Fashion has to be fun. It’s a big business, not a cure for cancer’

‘Fashion has to be fun. It’s a big business, not a cure for cancer’

Donatella Versace at New York Fashion Week