Police worker sacked for abusing force credit card

A Scotland Yard worker has been sacked for abusing a new corporate credit card introduced to stamp out fraud.

Dizaei cleared of misusing police credit card

Suspended senior Scotland Yard officer Ali Dizaei was cleared today of misusing his corporate credit card.

Credit card squeeze: has borrowing on plastic had its day?

The credit card market in Britain may be unsustainable.

Business Diary: Woman complains horse is too ill to ride

Faulty washing machines and toys feature prominently in customer complaints, but a sick horse is a new one on us. Nonetheless, the UK European Consumer Centre, which is two-years-old on Saturday, highlighted the case of a UK woman who was miffed at finding out that the £3,000 horse she bought from a Swedish trader suffering from a medical condition that prevented it from being ridden. The ECC's UK arm took up the case and a mediation body eventually ruled in her favour. The horse was sent back to the trader and the woman was reimbursed £3,000 plus damages. Neight a bad result.

David Prosser: Amex sends a warning

Outlook Here's a worrying straw in the wind from the credit card industry. American Express is to introduce a £20 charge for cardholders who haven't used their plastic during the previous 12 months (known as dormant accounts in the business). It's not unprecedented – Lloyds and Santander have similar fees – but it's another sign that all is not well in the credit card sector.

Spotlight: American Express Platinum Cashback card

American Express (AMEX) has reduced the amount its Platinum Cashback card pays – it has been the market-leader for some time, so how does it fare now?

Mary Dejevsky: A cherished tradition in black and white

A day-long street party has celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Beatles album cover everyone, but everyone, knows.

Beginner's Guide To: Cashback credit cards

It's a common misconception that the benefit of a credit card to those who clear their balance each month, is that their money stays in their current account earning interest for a bit longer. There are, however, deals out there which enable you to earn money each time you use them – so effectively profit from your spending. This week we take a look at cashback credit cards.

Anti-terror officer 'used force credit card in sex shop'

A debt-ridden anti-terrorist squad officer squandered thousands of pounds of taxpayers' cash in sex shops and on holidays and clothing, a court heard today.

Less pay, less work: but could it be a blessing in disguise?

Cuts hurt, but some workers and bosses are pulling together to save jobs. By Richard Northedge

American Express? That won't do nicely

Amex workers in the UK will count the cost of its decision to stop paying into its employees' pension scheme contributions

New credit card promises exciting extras – but paying on plastic can be a costly mistake

The battle to encourage people to switch credit cards takes a new turn next week when Egg relaunches its premium plastic card with better rewards and benefits. The main attraction of the new Egg Money World MasterCard is 1 per cent cashback on all transactions. The main disadvantage is a hefty £1 a month charge for the privilege.

Cashback spreads to loans – but be wary of the unexpected costs

Marks & Spencer is hoping to tempt consumers with a new cashback reward on its personal loans. Customers who take out a loan before 11 August will be offered a refund of 10 per cent of the interest paid. M&S offers a typical rate of 8.7 per cent on a £10,000 loan over 36 month which, with the cashback, drops to the equivalent of 7.9 per cent.

US banks to pay back $68bn in bailout funds

The US government will be repaid a third of the money it pumped into the country's teetering banks last year, after the Treasury department said 10 banks were strong enough to stand once again on their own two feet.

JPMorgan to raise $5bn in share sell-off

JPMorgan Chase headed a new round of fundraising activity by US financial firms last night, saying it would sell $5bn (£3bn) in new shares to help repay the $25bn it borrowed from the federal government during last year's credit market panic.

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

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It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

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It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

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Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
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Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
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Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
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The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

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