Voices

Everyone knows that the Assad regime – from father Hafez onwards – has employed torture and executions to preserve the doubtful purity of the Baath party

People trafficking protection measures slammed

Measures to protect victims of people smuggling are "not fit for purpose" and may be illegal, a report claimed today.

Dunga's men face a leap into the unknown

Preview: Brazil v North Korea, Today, 7.30pm, ITV1

Honour for <i>Independent's</i> Johann Hari

The Independent's Johann Hari was this week named National Newspaper Journalist of the Year in the prestigious Amnesty International Media Awards.

Call for inquiry into activist's death in Congo

The head of the United Nations mission in Democratic Republic of Congo yesterday called for an investigation into the death of a leading human rights activist found dead in the capital on Wednesday.

'Independent' writer honoured

Johann Hari, one of The Independent's most distinguished columnists, has won the 2009 Martha Gellhorn Prize for Journalism.

The Journey of Anders Sparrman, By Per W&#228;stberg, trans. Tom Geddes

It's hard to know which man has had the more remarkable life. Per Wästberg had his first national newspaper column at 12. He fought apartheid in South Africa, edited Sweden's largest daily newspaper, founded the Swedish section of Amnesty International, and is now chairman of the Nobel Committee for Literature. And he has written more than 50 books – novels, political works, essays and poems.

Business Diary: No FT, no comment for Amnesty

So it's shame on the Pink 'Un. The FT was the subject of a furious press release from Amnesty International yesterday, decrying the decision to pull an AI ad that criticised Shell's operations in Nigeria and appealed to the oil giant's shareholders to raise the issue at its AGM. At the rather unsporting time of 4.58pm. "Editorially, the FT was willing to run the ad, but it couldn't be given the legal assurances on the claims made against Shell," said a spokesman. Assurances that allowed the Metro and the Evening Standard to go ahead.

Belgium passes Europe's first ban on wearing burka in public

Parliament hails bill as victory for women, but Amnesty condemns attack on freedom

The <i>IoS</i> Happy List 2010

While others produce catalogues of the wealthy, heirs and heiresses, and the bonus-baggers, David Randall introduces our third annual list of those who give, rather than make or take

Diplomatic deals expose deportees to torture risk

Amnesty says Britain has led the way in relying on 'worthless' assurances

Gold Cup preview: Kauto can prove ascendant over fading rival star

The 82nd running of the week's centrepiece should provide an "I-was-there" moment. Kauto Star (3.20), going for his third Cheltenham Gold Cup, is poised to seal his greatness. The race has been hyped as the best-of-three decider between the defending champion and his Paul Nicholls-stablemate Denman, but that moment came and went last year and Denman has increasingly looked like a horse falling out of love with his job.

Weapon's Amnesty defuses two-horse race for Henderson

'Flighty' Irish prospect takes wing to soar beyond Long Run and Punchestowns

Sue Montgomery's Day Two Verdict: Walsh leaves his champion to mind fences

In the Champion Chase there is little room for error and even less time for a rider to organise his mount on the approach to a fence. "If you start doing that you'll land five lengths adrift of where you were," said Ruby Walsh, partner of today's hot favourite Master Minded (3.20), "so you have to leave it to the horse."

Nato 'ill-equipped to prevent Afghan civilian deaths'

Nato is ill-equipped to probe accidental loss of life or prevent further civilian deaths during its latest offensive in Afghanistan, Amnesty International warned today.

White House warns UK ruling could 'complicate' intelligence-sharing

The White House said it was "deeply disappointed" at a UK Appeal Court ruling that revealed intelligence relating to torture allegations in the case of a former Guantanamo detainee.

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
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Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
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Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

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However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

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Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
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Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

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Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent