Voices

Everyone knows that the Assad regime – from father Hafez onwards – has employed torture and executions to preserve the doubtful purity of the Baath party

Media Diary: Cure found for wild claims

A fascinating spat has broken out between Ben Goldacre, The Guardian's self-appointed judge of "Bad Science", and some of his fellow science specialists on the paper.

ICC urged to charge Syria over new claim of war crimes

Amnesty International has said that the Syrian regime may have committed war crimes during an army operation in which homes were shelled, fleeing villagers sniped and arrested civilians tortured and killed.

Fears for Tamils sent back to Sri Lanka from UK

More than two dozen Sri Lankan asylum seekers arrived back in Colombo yesterday after British authorities deported them despite warnings about possible threats to their safety.

Free Ayat now, Amnesty tells Bahrain regime

Amnesty International last night called on Bahrain to free Ayat al-Gormezi, the 20-year-old student who has become a symbol for those who have taken to the streets of the Gulf state to demand greater political freedoms.

Uganda to give free pepper spray to fight rapists

Young women are to be given free pepper spray to defend themselves against rapists, says Uganda's newly appointed junior minister for Youth and Children Ronald Kibuule, who has vowed to fight the high rate of sex crime.

Last Night's TV: Storyville &ndash; Amnesty! When They Are All Free, BBC4 <br/>Lead Balloon, BBC2

Virtue is its own reward, we're told, but it can dole out some ingenious punishments too, tormenting the well intentioned with unforeseen consequences. The Storyville film Amnesty! When They Are All Free began as what looked like a corporate celebration of the charity's 50th anniversary, full of fond memories and approving sentiments. But by the time it had finished it had become a lot more nuanced and ambiguous.

Egyptians decry 'virginity tests' on protesters

Activists and bloggers are pressing Egypt's military rulers to investigate accusations of serious abuses against protesters, including claims that soldiers subjected female detainees to so-called "virginity tests."

50 years of Amnesty art

For 50 years, Amnesty International has been shining a light on human-rights abuses around the world. To celebrate this landmark, the organisation is taking an exhibition around the world to display half a century's worth of campaign posters. Its collection of designs features work from the artists Pablo Picasso and Joan Miro, the photojournalists Stuart Franklin and Annie Leibovitz, and the young Thai artist Kwanchai Lichaikul.

i wins award for &quot;innovation and creativity&quot;

i has won the Platinum Award at the 2011 Newspaper Awards for its “innovation and creativity” in a troubled market. This year is first time the Platinum Award has been presented.

Khodorkovsky appeals against prison sentence

A Moscow court will this morning hear an appeal from the jailed oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky, against a sentence that will keep him in prison until at least 2017. His lawyers, who claim the case against Russia's former richest man is politically motivated, say they have little hope that the judge will overturn the guilty verdict.

'Independent' writers up for Amnesty award

Two journalists on The Independent have been nominated for Amnesty International's annual Media Awards.

Cooper Brown: Shock

I was finally allowed to see what Mulligan had been building to capture the Lesbian Sticker Lady. It seemed to be a series of wires with sucker pads on the end.

Heavy-handed Kashmir police take lessons in how not to kill

After 114 unarmed protesters die, securityforces are desperate to improve their image

New Bill 'would stop cases against multinationals'

Lobby groups including Amnesty International and the Corporate Responsibility Coalition have written to Jonathan Djanogly, a Justice minister, about proposals to reform civil litigation funding and costs.

Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
healthSteven Shaw - the 'Buddha of Breaststroke' - applies Alexander Technique to the watery sport
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footballShirt then goes on sale on Gumtree
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Terry Sue-Patt as Benny in the BBC children’s soap ‘Grange Hill’
voicesGrace Dent on Grange Hill and Terry Sue-Patt
Arts and Entertainment
The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
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Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010
music
News
A poster by Durham Constabulary
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Cameron Jerome
footballCanaries beat Boro to gain promotion to the Premier League
Arts and Entertainment
Emily McDowell Card that reads:
artCancer survivor Emily McDowell kicks back at the clichés
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Twin Peaks stars Joan Chen, Michael Ontkean, Kyle Maclachlan and Piper Laurie
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine