News Andrew Mitchell eventually received a begrudging apology following the 'Plebgate' affair

'We heard of a growing disillusion with the lack of professionalism of some representatives' says report

Britain's aid payouts 'are open to corruption abroad', says NAO

Britain's £461m overseas aid budget for tackling poverty could be open to fraud because of the lack of controls over the way it is spent in some of the poorest countries in the world, the public spending watchdog has warned. The National Audit Office said the Government's switch from project-linked funding to wider "budget support" for countries in an attempt to reduce poverty had led to "significant risks" that that the funds would be "misapplied for political reasons or through corruption".

Letter: Nato on trial

Letter: Nato on trial

Wednesday Law Report: 28 April 1999 - Jurisdiction to prevent anticipated proceedings

Ebert v Birch and another: Ebert v Vanvil and another Court of Appeal (Lord Woolf, Master of the Rolls, Lord Justice Otton and Lord Justice Aldous) 30 March 1999

Police trainers convicted of cruelty to dogs

THREE POLICE officers convicted of running a "brutal" training regime for police dogs in Essex walked free from court yesterday. Two were granted bail pending appeals against jail sentences, while the third was sentenced to 200 hours of community service.

Paralysed woman wins battle to keep her baby

A PREGNANT woman who was paralysed in a skydiving accident three years ago learnt yesterday that she will be allowed to keep her baby when it is born in a month's time.

Case summaries: 11 May 1998

The following notes of judgments were prepared by the reporters of the All England Law Reports.

Court had no jurisdiction to hear appeal

Law Report: 18 march 1998

Court frees man in military hacking case

The US Air Force said Matthew Bevan, 23, from Cardiff, was a hacker who posed a national security risk. The police said he was part of an international group of hackers. His wife said "I do" just 56 days after their first contact through an Internet "chatroom". And yesterday a judge said cleared him of three charges of "unauthorised access and modification" of computer files in the US.

Neil Hamilton granted public sleaze hearing

Neil Hamilton, the former Tory MP at the centre of the cash-for- questions row, will get his "day in court". The Commons standards watchdog yesterday granted Mr Hamilton his request for a televised hearing in which he can put his case to them personally.

The sleaze report: Scandal that changed the face of politics

The cash for questions affair permanently changed the face of British politics. It led to the demise of three ministers, and it resulted in the setting up of the Nolan Committee on Standards in Public Life, and the creation of a Parliamentary Commissioner, Sir Gordon Downey, whose report was published yesterday.

Play tag with Big Brother

New Labour, new chain gang. Labour MPs are being asked to wear electronic pagers attached to their belt so that the Downing Street thought police can give them instructions wherever they are.

Even before they lose, the Tory knives are out

A right- winger will still need to appeal across the spectrum. William Hague could fit the bill

Mitchell given mild rebuke over questions

The Social Security Minister Andrew Mitchell has escaped severe censure from a Commons committee investigating his role in the cash for questions affair. The decision saves Mr Mitchell from the fate suffered by David Willetts, the Government whip who was forced to resign last year after the same committee accused him of "dissembling".
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth: Would people co-operate to face down a global peril?

How to stop an asteroid hitting Earth

Would people cooperate to face a global peril?
Just one day to find €1.6bn: Greece edges nearer euro exit

One day to find €1.6bn

Greece is edging inexorably towards an exit from the euro
New 'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could help surgeons and firefighters, say scientists

'Iron Man' augmented reality technology could become reality

Holographic projections would provide extra information on objects in a person's visual field in real time
Sugary drinks 'are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year'

Sugary drinks are killing 184,000 adults around the world every year

The drinks that should be eliminated from people's diets
Pride of Place: Historians map out untold LGBT histories of locations throughout UK

Historians map out untold LGBT histories

Public are being asked to help improve the map
Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

Lionel, Patti, Burt and The Who rock Glasto

This was the year of 24-carat Golden Oldies
Paris Fashion Week

Paris Fashion Week

Thom Browne's scarecrows offer a rare beacon in commercial offerings
A year of the caliphate:

Isis, a year of the caliphate

Who can defeat the so-called 'Islamic State' – and how?
Marks and Spencer: Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?

Marks and Spencer

Can a new team of designers put the spark back into the high-street brand?
'We haven't invaded France': Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak

'We haven't invaded France'

Italy's Prime Minister 'reclaims' Europe's highest peak
Isis in Kobani: Why we ignore the worst of the massacres

Why do we ignore the worst of the massacres?

The West’s determination not to offend its Sunni allies helps Isis and puts us all at risk, says Patrick Cockburn
7/7 bombings 10 years on: Four emergency workers who saved lives recall the shocking day that 52 people were killed

Remembering 7/7 ten years on

Four emergency workers recall their memories of that day – and reveal how it's affected them ever since
Humans: Are the scientists developing robots in danger of replicating the hit Channel 4 drama?

They’re here to help

We want robots to do our drudge work, and to look enough like us for comfort. But are the scientists developing artificial intelligence in danger of replicating the TV drama Humans?
Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

Time to lay these myths about the Deep South to rest

'Heritage' is a loaded word in the Dixie, but the Charleston killings show how dangerous it is to cling to a deadly past, says Rupert Cornwell
What exactly does 'one' mean? Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue

What exactly does 'one' mean?

Court of Appeal passes judgement on thorny mathematical issue