News Sir Michael Wilshaw has vowed to tackle what he called 'a culture of casual acceptance' of low level disruption in schools

Schools will face “no notice” inspections of their pupils’ behaviour as from Monday.

Watchdog challenges Ernst & Young over Farepak

The accounting regulator has filed a formal complaint against the Big Four firm Ernst & Young over its auditing of the Christmas club and hamper group Farepak, which collapsed into administration in 2006.

Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi sentenced to a year in jail for tax fraud

After years of court cases, legal argument and allegations, the law finally caught up Silvio Berlusconi today when he was convicted in a criminal court and sentenced to four years in prison – later cut to one year – after prosecutors proved the billionaire ex-premier was guilty of a multi-million euro tax fraud. He has said he will appeal.

Children aged 12 to 15 now dedicate around 17 hours a week to the internet, up from about 15 hours online last year

Teenagers' life balance revealed: 17 hours weekly for TV and another 17 for internet

Young teenagers use up the equivalent of an average working week in front of a screen.

US Navy OKs $1 billion for missile called flawed by weapons tester

The U.S. Navy approved an Alliant Techsystems Inc. anti-radar missile for full production valued at as much as $1.1 billion, even though the Pentagon's chief tester says the weapon's performance flaws "largely negate" its "ability to accomplish its mission."

Hate-crime cases failing in court, says CPS

Increasing numbers of hate-crime prosecutions are collapsing because victims are backing out or their stories unravel in court, a new report from the Crown Prosecution Service reveals today.

Prisons chief Nick Hardwick warns over resources

Prisoners are spending too much time stuck in their cells watching daytime television because of a lack of resources, the Chief Inspector of Prisons has said.

9. (20) Sir Nicholas Hytner, Theatre director

Government neglect 'harming regional theatre'

The artistic director of the National Theatre (NT) yesterday warned of a "clear and present danger" for regional theatre in Britain if the Government continues to "neglect" the arts.

James Corden in One Man, Two Guvnors at the NT Lyttelton

Artistic director of National Theatre Sir Nicholas Hytner warns of 'clear and present danger' for regional theatre amid arts cuts

Sir Nicholas Hytner said at the launch of the NT’s annual report that he wanted to highlight “enormous short-term issues” for regional theatres, and said further cuts would be “madness”.

Director of the Tate Nicholas Serota

Tate chief Nicholas Serota: Keep arts in school

Sir Nicholas Serota, the director of the Tate, today urged the Government to keep the arts as a key part of the curriculum in any exams shake-up.

Leading article: No cause to duck reform of the SFO

There will be much rejoicing in the Serious Fraud Office over the multiple guilty verdicts on Asil Nadir, 17 years after he fled the UK claiming that his business affairs were being investigated improperly. In returning to face a British court, Nadir appeared to gamble that time had reduced the potency of the case against him. It had not – not least because his conduct lost a lot of people a lot of money. His company, Polly Peck International – a household name in its day – will go down in the annals as a byword for dishonest business.

Dr Martens rebuffed bids

The boot maker Dr Martens has said it abandoned plans to sell the business recently for up to £200m after bids received from private-equity firms failed to match its valuation.

Leading article: A damning judgment on the SFO

It is difficult to overstate the seriousness of the debacle that was the Serious Fraud Office's high-profile investigation of the property tycoons Vincent and Robert Tchenguiz. Indeed, the High Court judgment against the SFO yesterday represents a wholesale challenge to the competence and, worse still, good faith of the organisation which investigates and prosecutes complex fraud cases in the UK.

Japan's women lose longevity title

Japanese women are no longer the world's longest living, their longevity pushed down in part by last year's devastating earthquake and tsunami, according to a government report.

Oxfam shrugs off the gloom with a record income

Poverty charity Oxfam achieved record income figures last year despite the downturn in the third sector, which has left many charities struggling for donations.

Oxfam bucks trend with record £385m income

The poverty charity Oxfam achieved record income figures last year despite the downturn in the third sector, which has left many charities struggling for donations. The latest UK Giving Report published by the Charities Aid Foundation showed a 4.3 per cent drop in aggregate donations to large charities.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine