Sport Monty Panesar bowls in the nets at Adelaide as Alastair Cook looks on

Monty Panesar was initially dropped by England in strange circumstances. Looking back nearly five years it was as though he was squarely to blame for the beach which doubled as a cricket pitch at the Sir Viv Richards Recreation Ground in Antigua.

Disgrace that ECB are passing the bucks

Nobody resigns any more. Not if they can help it. We must become resigned to it. Only minutes after it was revealed that Sir Allen Stanford was being charged with fraud amounting to $8bn, Giles Clarke said he certainly would not be going anywhere.

On the Front Foot: England’s ship still afloat but Rec record is hard to fathom

After the great Test at the Rec, also known as the Antigua Recreation Ground, England no doubt felt miffed and robbed. They will hardly be consoled – especially as the match was never meant to be played – that they have extended the venue’s record as England’s least successful ever. There have now been seven Test matches between West Indies and England at the dilapidated but enduringly charming arena, of which the touring team have won none. At no other ground have they been quite so unrewarded. Wherever they have played a minimum of five matches, England have won at least one. It took until their seventh Test to win at the National Stadium, Karachi, a feat they came so close to equalling at the ARG. It was only the fourth match in which England have been denied victory for want of a single wicket, following those against India at Old Trafford in 1946 and at Lord’s in 2007, and against Australia at Old Trafford in 2005. For West Indies, who have lost three of their 22 Tests at the Rec, it was their second successive draw there with only one wicket in hand. Fidel Edwards, a last-wicket hero against India in 2006 when he batted for 57 minutes and faced 36 balls, was undefeated this time after 26 balls in 34 minutes. He is the only player in history to have three times been part of a last-wicket stand to save a Test match, his first being at Harare in 2003 when he batted for 32 minutes and successfully negotiated 33 balls. When he walked out at the Rec he must have thought the draw was in the bag.

England seek lift-off without Flintoff

Deflated tourists will have to live without their talismanic all-rounder for this week’s Test – and learn how to win again

Credit crisis diary: Rake’s progress (or not, as it turns out)

As the chairman of BT, one would expect Sir Michael Rake to be taking full advantage of the company’s gadgets and gizmos: at the very least, he has surely installed the BT home hub, which the telecoms giant spends lots of money advertising on television and elsewhere? Sadly not, as it turns out. It’s not that Sir Michael has no confidence in BT’s excellent suite of broadband products – quite the contrary in fact. It’s just that his home-counties dwelling is a little off the beaten track, and beyond the reach of the current broadband network.

Stanford’s bank taken over by state

Texan billionaire holed up in girlfriend’s house as net closes on his operations

James Lawton: Antigua’s epic finale provides a true test of cricket’s real worth

Given a little more time to observe and reflect, the great Caribbean patriot and political activist, C L R James, who died 20 years ago, might have written a supplementary to his haunting question, “What do they know of cricket who only cricket know?”

Ship-shape shore: English Harbour is a Caribbean haven rich in maritime history

Linda Cookson visits the Georgian dockside – and joins the ‘jump up’

Twenty20 plans left in tatters after ECB severs ties with Stanford

English cricket last night severed all ties with Sir Allen Stanford, and his business. The Texan billionaire has been charged in connection with an alleged $9.2 billion (£6.4bn) fraud, although he denies all charges.

ECB sever all ties with Sir Allen Stanford

The England and Wales Cricket Board have terminated all contractual links with Sir Allen Stanford.

Tony Cozier: West Indies end with tail up after dispiriting week

It took the composure of tailenders not reputed for such level-headedness to secure it, but the draw that the West Indies eked out in the fading light here yesterday brought a dreadful week to a positive end.

ECB 'should hand back' Stanford cash

Bransgrove says it would be wrong for counties to hang on to money from billionaire

Stanford tracked down by FBI

Billionaire found in Virginia as authorities launch criminal investigation into money laundering claims

England toil in Antigua

Andrew Flintoff could not inspire a breakthrough as England toiled without reward in their bid for Test victory at the Antigua Recreation Ground.

Public borrowing soars to record levels

Public borrowing ballooned to a record £67.2bn in the nine months to January, official figures showed today.

Fraud investigators hunt elusive Stanford

Investigators in the US have said they do not know the whereabouts of Sir Allen Stanford, the cricket entrepreneur charged with a multi-billion dollar fraud.

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