Sport Monty Panesar bowls in the nets at Adelaide as Alastair Cook looks on

Monty Panesar was initially dropped by England in strange circumstances. Looking back nearly five years it was as though he was squarely to blame for the beach which doubled as a cricket pitch at the Sir Viv Richards Recreation Ground in Antigua.

Richards' rapid win puts the heat on Ohuruogu

American sets best 400m time of the year in emphatic Golden League victory

Honours: Commonwealth

Stanford 'was informant for US anti-drug agents'

Authorities accused of turning a blind eye to financier's banking business

The Complete Guide To Guatemala

Rich in history, culture and nature, this Central American nation is a feast for the senses. And as Alessia Horwich discovered, it is also a great destination for the budget traveller

Cricket's tarnished tycoon is left 'living on charity'

In an exclusive interview with <i>The Independent</i>, Allen Stanford's fiancée talks about life under siege with the billionaire fighting fraud charges

Pietersen's desire to escape led to rejected request

For all his renowned mental strength and self belief Kevin Pietersen must have felt the world was falling in on him yesterday. Two days after he claimed to be at the end of his tether it emerged that he had asked permission to leave England's tour of the West Indies to spend 48 hours at home. The request, made between the third and fourth Test matches, was refused.

Windies player strike could ruin Flintoff's return

Andrew Flintoff will be fit for the rest of England's one-day series in the West Indies. That assumes, of course, that his fragile body can withstand the rigours of the three matches that remain, two of which England must win to salvage something from their disappointing winter.

Returning to El Salvador

Charles Nevin adopted his son, Cristian, in war-torn El Salvador in 1991. Eighteen years on, the family returned to discover a very different country

Flower blossoms to make telling case for staying put

England's stand-in coach has grown in stature despite his side's series defeat, writes Stephen Brenkley in Trinidad

Tony Cozier: Windies draw strength from overdue triumph

The ends always justify the means and, in spite of the always dangerous policy of choosing a team and applying tactics from the start with the sole intention of earning a draw, the West Indies just managed to achieve their goal in the decisive final Test yesterday.

Tony Cozier: Relief alleviates pain for centurion Gayle

For Chris Gayle, the physical pain would have been trifling compared to the mental anguish. As soon as the West Indies captain felt the sharp pain at the back of his right thigh after completing the sharp, risky single to raise his hundred yesterday, he knew his team's chances of protecting their 1-0 lead in the series were out of his hands.

On the Front Foot: Referral regulation offers little appeal for anyone on the pitch

Referrals should be referred to the International Cricket Council for reconsideration. The series between West Indies and England has been marred by them, and that is likely to be matched by consternation at their use in the Tests between South Africa and Australia. The system has so far been hopeless in the Caribbean. Players and umpires despise referrals at worst, are discomfited by them at best. They have caused time to be wasted and frivolous appeals to be lodged. Worse, they have led to confusion and injustice, precisely what they were instigated to eradicate. The best match was easily the second in Antigua, played in the old-fashioned way without referrals. A case, albeit a flimsy one, could be made for suggesting the fate of the series has been predicated on an experiment. Ramnaresh Sarwan was five in the West Indies first innings at Kingston when he was adjudged leg before to Stephen Harmison. Might have been high, might not, as the TV replays also indicated. However, Sarwan, having been given out, was then reprieved, since when he has never looked back, adding another 592 runs in the series at an average of 150. Harmison has taken four wickets at nearly 37 runs each and been dropped, and England are 1-0 down. The Umpiring Decision Review System (UDRS for short, and best left as a cow's mammary gland) was a good idea notionally. And its proponents would point out that England's best player, Kevin Pietersen, was saved by it on Friday when he was given out lbw to a ball that had plainly pitched outside leg stump. There is strong word that the ICC might try another method in which umpires make their own referrals. But this is fraught with conflict because the umpires would need to have doubt when they are supposed to have certainty, and would be under constant pressure to refer.

On The Road: Lava rocks - the most natural of barbecues

Geology got interesting today, really interesting. Today I got to the business end of the cinder and pumice slopes of Pacaya volcano in Guatemala. Oozing gnarly orange lumps from weak spots like an old, metal toothpaste tube, the red-hot lava smashed and bounced down the slopes, spinning shrapnel firebombs off at frightening speed.

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