Arkansas

Chris Christie’s weight-loss surgery feeds talk he could run for the

When Chris Christie briefly considered a bid for the White House in 2011, many suggested the popular New Jersey Governor was too fat to be President. However, if he decides to run in 2016 his weight may be less of a burden; in an interview with the New York Post, Christie has revealed that he underwent secret gastric-band surgery earlier this year, and observers say it is already paying off.

Mindy McCready suicide confirmed

Preliminary results of a post-mortem examination confirm that US country music star Mindy McCready's death was suicide, authorities in Arkansas said today.

Cajun country to be Mississippi flood scarifice

Army engineers will open a key spillway along the bulging Mississippi River as early as today, deluging thousands of homes and farms in Louisiana's Cajun country in order to avert a potentially bigger disaster in Baton Rouge and New Orleans.

Album: Bill Frisell, Disfarmer (Nonesuch)

Even Damon Albarn and Jack White have some distance to go to equal the genre-bending achievements of Bill Frisell, not just the outstanding jazz guitarist of his era but also the most diversely prolific, equally at home providing accompaniment to Buster Keaton movies as he is collaborating with Elvis Costello.

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Arkansas: Hot springs eternal

In the summer of 1992, Simon Calder visited the state of Arkansas, where the Governor was preparing to stand for president. He found a sleepy backwater with charm to spare

US Bible Belt begins clear-up after the worst tornadoes in 20 years

Dazed survivors of the worst tornadoes to hit the American Bible Belt in more than two decades surveyed the wreckage of their flattened homes yesterday, as state and federal clean-up crews herded them into temporary shelters and started to tackle downed power lines, severed gas pipes, fallen trees and debris as far as the eye could see.

Picture Post: Storm force: tornadoes in the Deep South

The polls were just closing in America's Super Tuesday primary contests when the apocalypse came – not a political apocalypse but a swirl of tornadoes that ripped across the voting states of Tennessee and Arkansas, killing at least 48 people and injuring hundreds of others. Roofs flew off buildings like lids off jam jars. Cars and trucks were tossed across roads. Mobile homes crumpled, and even solidly built houses collapsed, leaving nothing but their concrete foundations standing. Phone and power lines blew down. Trees snapped.